Linked by the_randymon on Mon 7th Jan 2013 18:56 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes The mostly-morubund Hurd project is well known for what it's not: the kernel at the heart of the GNU/Linux system. But there's a long and interesting story about what it could have been, too. From Linux User magazine: "The design of the Hurd was an attempt to embody the spirit and promise of the free software movement in code." Those are mighty ambitions, and this story is as much about competing visions as competing kernels. Says Thomas Bushnell: "My first choice was to take the BSD 4.4-Lite release and make a kernel. I knew the code, I knew how to do it. It is now perfectly obvious to me that this would have succeeded splendidly and the world would be a very different place today." This is a well-written and fascinating read.
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RE: Comment by kurkosdr
by MOS6510 on Tue 8th Jan 2013 19:01 UTC in reply to "Comment by kurkosdr"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

The whole naming thing is silly, just call it Linux. Yes, technically that's only the kernel, but we all know what someone means when he says he's running Linux on his server or desktop and when it's running on his phone.

Calling it GNU/Linux just wears your keyboard out more and it's, well, kind of listing the spec/features of the operating system with no added value. Why not call it GNU/Linux/ext4 or GRUB/GNU/Linux/ext4/swapon?

To me it seems GNU/Linux is an attempt by Stallman to stick his name on it making it look like a team effort between him/FSF and Linus. While GNU plays a big part in most Linux distributions a lot of parties also do. Stuff like Apache, Python, Postfix, KDE. GNU makes a Linux OS work, but all those third party projects give Linux its real use.

Typing ls, grep, ps, etc... (pun intended) is rather useless without anything real running like a web or email server.

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