Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Feb 2013 15:22 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones "'But how is it going to beat Android or iOS?' That's the reaction many people have when I tell them that I am working on Firefox OS, the new mobile operating system from Mozilla. It is a logical reaction. After all, we live in times where every major software company and its mother is releasing a mobile platform, struggling to lure developers into their new proprietary environment, APIs, libraries, etc. And indeed, many of these companies barely make it or don’t make it at all. But Firefox OS will not be directly battling against other mobile platforms. Its main objective is to change the way the world develops mobile apps, and even in the unlikely event that Firefox OS itself disappears in the process, if web-apps become mainstream, it will have succeeded."
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lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

This rings true.

I spent 4 hours tracking down and finding a pure CSS fix for an IE7 rendering bug today, where tbh my time could have been spent elsewhere.

http://blog.jquery.com/2013/01/14/the-state-of-jquery-2013/

But to the point about cross-browser issues, it’s a complete myth that today’s modern browsers have no differences. Look through the jQuery source code and you’ll see plenty of places where it has to fix, patch, and mask issues in modern browsers; those problems didn’t end with IE8. jQuery 2.0 now has more patches and shims for Chrome, Safari, and Firefox than for Internet Explorer!


They are referring to modern IE rather those that are becoming legacy rather quickly. But the point is quite clear, the jQuery team obviously have to put a lot of resources into making sure that their library works the same across each browser.

Edited 2013-02-11 21:17 UTC

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