Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 6th May 2013 19:11 UTC
Games Good news by Ars' Peter Bright. "According to an internal Microsoft e-mail sent to all full-time employees working on the next Xbox, 'Durango [the codename for the next Xbox] is designed to deliver the future of entertainment while engineered to be tolerant of today's Internet.' It continues, 'There are a number of scenarios that our users expect to work without an Internet connection, and those should 'just work' regardless of their current connection status. Those include, but are not limited to: playing a Blu-ray disc, watching live TV, and yes playing a single player game.'" Conveniently 'leaked' of course.
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RE[4]: Bluray eh?
by Moochman on Tue 7th May 2013 22:45 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Bluray eh?"
Moochman
Member since:
2005-07-06

You make good points. It also pisses me off when there are menus on Blu-rays that you can't skip over -- they tend to be long and extremely irritating to a greater extent than DVDs of yore. But Blu-rays also have some additional advantages (other than the obvious image quality advantage):

-(this is a big one for me) Something like 50% of Blu-rays are region-free
-They are relatively scratch-proof (extra protective coating) = you don't need to be as paranoid, and there will theoretically be a good future used Blu-ray market (although the death of the video rental shop may make this point moot)
-They are capable of interactive content (this may be good or bad depending on your perspective)

As far as your argument that DVDs are "easier to rip and play on PCs", that's just how technology works, you have more data you're dealing with so of course your computer takes longer to process it. I'll gladly take that tradeoff for better picture quality, especially considering that I watch 90% of films directly on my TV via the PS3. Anyway, I assume the primary reason for ripping is to watch on other devices, and theoretically at least, UltraViolet is supposed to be the savior there.

But I guess it depends what type of person you are. For me I only actually buy physical copies of movies (as opposed to streaming or whatever) for films that I feel really deserve it from a picture quality/film quality perspective -- and then, I want to watch it in the very best quality possible.

Edited 2013-05-07 22:46 UTC

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