Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 6th Jun 2013 15:33 UTC
Legal "The National Security Agency is currently collecting the telephone records of millions of US customers of Verizon, one of America's largest telecoms providers, under a top secret court order issued in April. The order, a copy of which has been obtained by the Guardian, requires Verizon on an 'ongoing, daily basis' to give the NSA information on all telephone calls in its systems, both within the US and between the US and other countries. The document shows for the first time that under the Obama administration the communication records of millions of US citizens are being collected indiscriminately and in bulk - regardless of whether they are suspected of any wrongdoing." Hey Americans, welcome to the club. And here we were, afraid of Google!
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RE: History Repeating
by The1stImmortal on Thu 6th Jun 2013 21:41 UTC in reply to "History Repeating"
The1stImmortal
Member since:
2005-10-20

"The court order expressly bars Verizon from disclosing to the public either the existence of the FBI's request for its customers' records, or the court order itself."

This is what has me extremely concerned. The government is actively hiding the fact that they're collecting this information. Democracy does not work under such circumstances and I'm getting really tired of having a government which thinks it's entitled to act outside of public scrutiny and impose itself against our will. They're supposed to be working for the taxpayers, not overseeing us. Most of us know this is wrong, and yet we don't have the power to stop it democratically. The legendary founding fathers would be terribly disappointed in what has become of their "land of the free".

I've always wondered how strongly you can hint at something before violating these kinds of orders. A random out of the blue press release along the lines of
"The US Federal Government has the power to summarily order the ongoing disclosure of the call records of all citizens by a carrier without recourse or appeal. We cannot confirm nor deny whether this kind of request has ever been received by this company.
Additionally, we wish to advise customers that we will be upgrading our billing and call recording systems to allow us to assist law enforcement in the event that they need access to such information.
Finally, we wish to remind customers to always conduct only legal business over our phone network, to remain in compliance with various communications laws."

Would something like that be in violation or not? It rather obviously tells people what's happened without telling people what's happened...

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