Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Sep 2013 11:46 UTC
Legal

Microsoft paid billions for a license to Nokia's patents, but the company has made explicit that Nokia still owns the patents. The genius of this move is that it allows Microsoft to double down on its patent war with Android. Microsoft boasts that the majority of Android phones sold worldwide have already paid for a license to Microsoft patents. By 2011, patent licensing revenue exceeded Microsoft's revenue from Windows Phone.

Now, Nokia can go after Android phone makers for royalties - even ones that have already paid Microsoft.

When pressed on the issue today, a Nokia spokesman confirmed that more patent licensing is indeed part of the plan.

So, without products, Nokia will become a true patent troll. Good to know.

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RE[5]: Comment by shmerl
by Nelson on Wed 4th Sep 2013 23:01 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by shmerl"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

MS bought a licence to the patents. They obviously didn't want to buy the patents outright, or they would have done so. It makes no sense to compete to buy them outright after having passed over that opportunity and already having shelled out for the licence, you don't pay for a licence and the patents themselves when the patents themselves provides everything a licence does and more.


That's assuming that they were for sale, if Nokia wanted to retain them then they were within their rights to do so, and I think they had enough leverage.

Especially if IPR is how Nokia intends to monetize in the future.


I fail to see how having bought Moto pertains to this at all, Google certainly has more cash now than when they bought Moto, more than $50 billion. Nobody ever suggested they were a 'lock'.


Well, Motorola has given Google approximately zero bang for their buck. All of their patent offensives with Moto have failed. Every single one. They don't want to be burned again.

I'm sure Motorola looked very attractive IP wise before their purchase, I don't think there's the stomach for something like this in the future.

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