Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 7th Dec 2013 00:55 UTC
Microsoft

"It's pretty much a brick," says Pawn Stars' Rick Harrison as he rejects a Samsung Chromebook brought in by an actor playing a customer. Microsoft really doesn't want you buying this thing.

But why? Just how big of a threat are Chromebooks, Google's oft-ridiculed web-only laptops, to Microsoft's core business?

I'm puzzled too. It doesn't seem like Chromebooks are that big of a threat - why create terrible advertisements that only provide Google with free publicity?

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It's simply a matter of Free vs. Proprietary
by cmost on Sat 7th Dec 2013 16:58 UTC
cmost
Member since:
2006-07-16

Chromebooks are a threat to Microsoft simply because they provide with free technologies what Microsoft charges big bucks for. ChromeOS is a free ecosystem system built around other free tools such as Chrome, Google Documents, Gmail, Picassa and myriad other quality, stable technologies. It's also free from malware and rooted in the rock stable Linux kernel.

With Microsoft's technologies there are hefty licensing fees for Windows itself, which comes with basically nothing. Then you have to pay more for Office, Microsoft Money, etc., etc., etc. Plus you need anti-virus and anti-malware software which McAfee and Norton are only too willing to charge you for as well. Add something like PhotoShop and now we're talking $1000 in software that you must pay every other year to upgrade. Users are forced to put up with bugs, or bonehead decisions like removing the Start button all because they've been brainwashed to think that higher price means higher quality. I haven't used proprietary software in over a decade and there's nothing I can't do with my computers.

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