Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 24th Dec 2013 15:56 UTC, submitted by M.Onty
In the News

"His later life was overshadowed by his conviction for homosexual activity, a sentence we would now consider unjust and discriminatory and which has now been repealed," said Mr Grayling.

"Turing deserves to be remembered and recognised for his fantastic contribution to the war effort and his legacy to science. A pardon from the Queen is a fitting tribute to an exceptional man."

Finally.

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RE[5]: Comment by Wafflez
by M.Onty on Sat 28th Dec 2013 19:22 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Wafflez"
M.Onty
Member since:
2009-10-23

"In other countries, people who have been treated unfairly have recourse in courts of law. Does anyone know the laws of the UK well enough, to comment on this? Could the victims of these types of laws sue the government?"


As he was found guilty of breaking a law, & no-one seriously imagines he might not have broken it, there isn't going to be any recourse in courts of law.

For that to work judges & juries would have to have the right to strike off laws retroactively. No legal system works like that so far as I know.

On the other hand pardons are extra-judicial, so far simpler to implement.

The best way for a family member to pursue justice a case like this would be to petition the Home Secretary or, more ambitiously, petition their MP to raise a private member's bill in the Commons.

[Edit, as a forgot to answer your question straight up]

I don't imagine the Govt had much to do with the original ruling. I suppose there might be a case to be made about allowing chemical castration in the legal system, but as it was voluntary, that probably wouldn't work either.

In general its not easy to sue HMG. It only tends to work if it was complicit in something outside the legal system, such as 'extraordinary rendition' (helping the CIA kidnap people), or torturing suspected Mao Mao terrorists (during the uprising in Kenya, in the 50s).

Edited 2013-12-28 19:29 UTC

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