Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Feb 2014 22:20 UTC
Internet & Networking

Facebook today announced that it has reached a definitive agreement to acquire WhatsApp, a rapidly growing cross-platform mobile messaging company, for a total of approximately $16 billion, including $4 billion in cash and approximately $12 billion worth of Facebook shares. The agreement also provides for an additional $3 billion in restricted stock units to be granted to WhatsApp’s founders and employees that will vest over four years subsequent to closing.

A huge deal. WhatsApp is one of the biggest messaging services is in the world - maybe even the biggest.

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RE: XMPP
by WereCatf on Thu 20th Feb 2014 02:29 UTC in reply to "XMPP"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

Facebook chat uses XMPP. Whatsapp uses a closed kind of XMPP. Great for the future of XMPP.


I like XMPP. I like how it's decentralized and works similar to e-mail and I like the fact that I can host my own server for that. I just wish there were some good clients to use with XMPP, especially for Android; I'm using Xabber on my phone, but it's...rather limited. It doesn't do audio or video chat, it doesn't do file-transfer, it's just barebones text-chat. I tried Tigase-messenger, but it's buggy and often my messages get lost in /dev/null for no apparent good reason.

Also, I haven't heard of anything interesting happening wrt. the protocol itself, it seems to have stagnated and it's gotten outdated. It doesn't offer any of the things that people look for in modern IM-applications and platforms, like e.g. hires avatars, or the ability to store a small selection of pictures on the server on your profile so others could peruse them even when you're not present. Especially the avatars are horribly outdated by today's standards as the spec officially, as far as I can remember, restricted them to 64x64 pixels in size.

IMHO there should be at least some more attention paid to features that your average citizen uses just so we could hopefully wean more of them out of proprietary, insecure solutions. I mean, we all would benefit if a secure, fully-open spec gained ground.

Edited 2014-02-20 02:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6