Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 13th May 2014 16:58 UTC
Apple

iOS 8 is likely to supercharge the functionality of Apple's iPad with a new split-screen multitasking feature, according to sources with knowledge of the enhancement in development. These people say that the feature will allow iPad users to run and interact with two iPad applications at once. Up until now, each iPad application either developed by Apple or available on the App Store is only usable individually in a full-screen view.

The ability to use multiple applications simultaneously on a tablet's display takes a page out of Microsoft's playbook. Microsoft's Surface line of tablets has a popular "snap" multitasking feature that allows customers to snap multiple apps onto the screen for simultaneous usage. The feature is popular in the enterprise and in environments where users need to handle multiple tasks at the same time.

No, this is not a "page out of Microsoft's playbook". What is wrong with these people that features that have been part of computing for decades are now magically new just because they're on a mobile device?

Please, stop this madness.

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Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Tue 13th May 2014 19:21 UTC
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

No, this is not a "page out of Microsoft's playbook". What is wrong with these people that features that have been part of computing for decades are now magically new just because they're on a mobile device?


Yes, it is a page out of Microsoft's playbook, because they're the only tablet maker that is actually doing this. Are you purposely ignoring context? The article is talking about the iPad, so that phrase is obviously in the context of tablets.

On the few other tablets and phones, it was a hack, and didn't ever work well because it wasn't supported by the overwhelming majority of apps. The fact that Windows 8 Metro apps actually support it without hacks or workarounds, and that Apple is doing the same, likely because of Microsoft's support, absolutely means that it is a page out of Microsoft's playbook.

The fact that this is a standard feature on desktops is irrelevant, because the article isn't about desktop computing at all, which is still a completely different beast from tablet computing.

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