Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 7th Sep 2014 23:09 UTC
Windows

And that's when it hit me, OneNote is the Pro 3 killer feature. This is what makes it not just another tablet or a laptop, it's OneNote and if you are not in the OneNote world, the competitive advantage of this feature diminishes the use of the device. But here is where it all made sense and not just with the Surface Pro 3.

I'll be on vacation in the US late October/early November, and since electronics are a lot cheaper in the US than here, I'm going to buy a new laptop while I'm there. I've been debating the MacBook Air, Acer S7, and the Surface Pro 3, but when I line up all my needs and wants, the Pro 3 comes out so far ahead it's just a humiliation for the other two.

The MBA is out of the question because I prefer the Windows version of Office (Office is hugely important for my line of work). On top of that, its display is far too outdated and low-resolution to warrant the total laptop's price tag. The choice between the S7 and the Pro 3 is more interesting, but in the end, I know the quality feel of Surface devices first-hand. The lightness and thinness really stand out too (this photo really illustrates just how thin the Pro 3 really is).

Software-wise, I will use the Pro 3 as a laptop, and I like using Windows 8.x as a desktop operating system, so after disabling the horrid Metro crap it'll be my ideal laptop. I'll of course play around with all these machines before making the actual choice, but on paper, it's no contest for me.

The whole OneNote stuff that this article highlights hadn't even crossed my mind. I'm currently not really a OneNote user, and I don't make a whole lot of notes as it is (my memory is creepy good - I remember almost every posted and submitted story on OSNews going back 8 years), but the idea of using the pen and quickly note down a thought and have it synced everywhere appeals to me.

I think the eventual sales figures for the Surface Pro 3 will not reflect its actual quality very well - much like how Windows Phone sales do not really match its quality either. It's the reality of the market, and it's easy to laugh it off 'because Microsoft', but remember that this reality affects many promising, quality products - which are not made by the big boys.

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benjymouse
Member since:
2011-08-06

But didn't they design Surface 3's kickstand to be better useable at multiple angles?


Yes. When you flip it out it is frictionless until apx 20 degrees. After that there is considerable friction so you can adjust the kickstand to virtually angle from 20 to around 160 degrees (give and take).


I remember having read that it's also more useable on one's lap, too.


Yes, in addition to the kickstand, the keyboard can attach to more of the surface, thus adding stability when attached. It gives a lot of extra stability, but it is not comparable to a laptop.

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