Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Mar 2017 23:42 UTC
In the News

Now refrigerators last 8-10 years, if you are fortunate. How in the world have our appliances regressed so much in the past few decades? I've bought and sold refrigerators and freezers from the 1950s that still work perfectly fine. I've come across washers and dryers from the 1960s and 1970s that were still working like the day they were made. Now, many appliances break and need servicing within 2-3 years and, overall, new appliances last 1/3 to 1/4 as long as appliances built decades ago. They break more frequently, and sooner, than ever before. They rust and deteriorate much quicker than in the past. Why is this happening, and what's really going on? I've been wrestling over these questions for years while selling thousands of appliances, and more recently, working with used appliance sellers and repair techs all across the country. The following is what I've discovered.

This is something we've all instinctively known, but Ryan Finlay goes into detail as to what, exactly, are the causes. The article's from 2015, but I stumbled on it today on Twitter, and I thought it was a great, informative read.

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RE[2]: Comment by joekiser
by joekiser on Wed 22nd Mar 2017 12:30 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by joekiser"
joekiser
Member since:
2005-06-30

I think part of the problem is that currently there is opportunity for monopoly on who can repair. When a company is responsible for selling new products AND repairing older models, there is a conflict of interest where selling a new product takes precedence.

Opening it up for anybody to repair a device would allow consumers to purchase products with longevity in mind.

Or something like that.

Reply Parent Score: 2