Linked by intric8 on Tue 28th Mar 2017 20:59 UTC
Amiga & AROS

The Amiga has what is with no doubt in my mind, the absolute finest sound chip inside of any computer or console throughout the 1980's as well as most, if not all of the 1990's. Full disclosure; I have an MT-32... And the Amiga can actually do a piano. Yes, in a time when the vast majority of IBM and compatible PC owners were using a small speaker stuck deep inside of a metal tomb, Amiga users had a quality of sound nobody else could touch for that price.

[...]

To combat the story that has long been shaped that the Amiga was not popular to musicians because it did not have built in MIDI connectors I give you this quote given directly to me from the creator of the sequencing program Music-X, Talin:

"The story with MIDI is actually much more complex than most people realize. You see, the early Amiga models had a hardware bug which made the serial port unreliable at high data rates. Basically the problem was that the serial port hardware had only a one-byte buffer, and if you didn't grab that byte before the next byte came in then data would be lost. Unfortunately, the Amiga's four timer chips would generate a software interrupt at regular intervals, during which time the serial port could not be serviced. And while MIDI speed wasn't super-high, it was high enough that you'd get a dropped byte every 10 minutes or so depending on how many notes you were sending over. Note that this did not affect the higher-end MIDI adapters which had their own dedicated serial point, but those were considerably more expensive."

Interesting article about past MIDI challenges with the Amiga and how to hook up a modern synth to an Amiga to make music.

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RE[2]: MIDI == Atari ST
by Earl C Pottinger on Wed 29th Mar 2017 01:21 UTC in reply to "RE: MIDI == Atari ST"
Earl C Pottinger
Member since:
2008-07-12

I get what you are saying about the interrupt, but I bet the various DMA channels that the Amiga had could also throw off the timing at lot more.

There was a lot of things going over the memory channel.

Edited 2017-03-29 01:22 UTC

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