Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Feb 2018 01:02 UTC
Windows

Windows 10 S, the Microsoft Store-only version of Windows, is going away, but not really.

Currently, Windows 10 S is a unique edition of Windows 10. It's based on Windows 10 Pro; Windows 10 Pro has various facilities that enable system administrators to restrict which software can be run, and Windows 10 S is essentially a preconfigured version of those facilities. In addition to locking out arbitrary downloaded programs, it also prevents the use of certain built-in Windows features such as the command-line, PowerShell, and Windows Subsystem for Linux.

For those who can't abide by the constraints that S imposes, you can upgrade 10 S to the full 10 Pro. This upgrade is a one-shot deal: there's no way of re-enabling the S limitations after upgrading to Pro. It's also a paid upgrade: while Microsoft offered it as a free upgrade for a limited time for its Surface Laptop, the regular price is $49.

Nothing much actually seems to be changing; it just turns Windows 10 S from a version into a mode. Pretty much a distinction without a difference. My biggest issue here is that you can't go from regular Windows 10 back to Windows 10 S if you ever had a reason to do so (e.g. if Windows were ever to be usable with just Metro apps in the future and you want the additional security Windows 10 S provides). Seems like an odd restriction.

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RE: Time
by dionicio on Wed 7th Feb 2018 16:03 UTC in reply to "Time"
dionicio
Member since:
2006-07-12

:D

Well, It is a very good idea, actually -Computers falling back to the free version on caducating the high maintenance, loosely controlled, desktop version.

[Your "Pro" profile going into hibernation].

Still usable junk, give it to poor, or pay renewal -which should go logarithmically lower, as you become senior client, by the way.

A caducated machine have already paid original duty. Should allow UEFI install of Open Software, for poor, for students.

Edited 2018-02-07 16:13 UTC

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