Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jul 2005 15:12 UTC, submitted by anonymous
Linux In this first of a two-part series, learn about system and environment requirements, the best ways to acquire Linux source code, how to configure and boot your new kernel, and how to use the printk function to print messages during bootup.
Permalink for comment 7382
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: New hardware
by Milo_Hoffman on Thu 21st Jul 2005 21:56 UTC
Milo_Hoffman
Member since:
2005-07-06

>What happens if you get a new piece of hardware that
>happens to not be supported "out of the box" by your
>distributor (but is by Linux)?

Ahh...I see this as being more of a 'WINDO-ISM' than anything else.

Its hard for people to let go of their old habits of going and downloading drivers from a dozen different places, installing from 20 cd's etc just to get their hardware to work right. Thats the "windows way". Linux supports more hardware out of the box than any other OS. In the Linux world, your hardware is basically supported or its not. Normal users are NEVER expected to add hardware support to their kernel themselves, thats what hardware compatibility lists are for. There are a couple of exceptions for some vendors who have automated the install of their hardware support so non-technical people can perform the install such as Nvidia, ATI etc.. but generally speaking a Linux "user" should never have to install a "driver" like the way you do with an OS that has such poor hardware support out of the box as Windows.

Reply Score: 1