Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 31st Dec 2005 16:55 UTC
Windows Microsoft acknowledged late Wednesday the existence of a zero-day exploit for Windows Metafile images, and said it was looking into ways to better protect its customers. Even worse, by the end of the day nearly 50 variants of the exploit had already appeared. One security company said the possibilities were endless on how the flaw could be exploited. 'This vulnerability can be used to install any type of malicious code, not just Trojans and spyware, but also worms, bots or viruses that can cause irreparable damage to computers,' said Luis Corrons of Panda Software.
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please forgive me for continuing
by ZaNkY on Sat 31st Dec 2005 22:50 UTC
ZaNkY
Member since:
2005-10-18

That is so true. I abhor the thought about destroying computers ;)

I lost the link that I had earlier that showed how to switch to ring0, but I found many, many more on Google. This is one off of Phrack, if anyone knows them.

I'm a security enthusiast, it's kinda my job to know what can and can't be done.

The link as promised ;)
http://www.phrack.org/show.php?p=59&a=16

You don't need to download the entire magazine, just Crtl-F for "ring0".

I'm not going to link to any potentially destructive code, although I will assure you, it exists.

My point being, that:

1) It is possible to enter ring0 execution (easily at that)
2) It is possible to damage hardware, although it would be incredibly hard. Keyword: POSSIBLE



I also want to apologize for going way off track, but it is always necessary to consider the worse case scenario, isn't it? Yes, someone malicious enough, knowledgeable, and cruel, could bring about chaos by inlineing ring0 execution code, that fries CPUs with some over-clocking, upping vcore, shutting down fans (while still making sure that safeguards don't shut the system down), or some combinations thereof, into some wmf file, that is placed on Google, MSN, and yahoo's front pages through some DNS poisoning technique, web defacing, or other random method.

What a run-on sentence ;) P


Again, forgive me for going off track, this will be the last comment I place in this news article relating to the above. I strongly believe that this issue is not being taken as serious as it should be. Patch up!

--ZaNkY


(note: this wmf thing is sort of like that GDI JPEG exploit thing, correct me if Iím wrong )

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