Linked by Gabe Yoder on Tue 11th Nov 2003 21:51 UTC
FreeBSD We've all heard the age old argument second only to the vi vs. emacs religious wars: FreeBSD Vs Linux. As a long time linux user, I decided that is was time I spent some time on the other side of the fence to see if it was any greener. Oh, and by the way, vi rules.
Permalink for comment
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
OK.....
by Namaseit on Thu 13th Nov 2003 20:03 UTC

Finally, when RMS gets around to writing a plain-talk GPL without the normal legalese I feel that a fair number more people would take notice of the implied meaning. However, I for one would respect him a LOT more if he did just that. It is not likely though, and _that_ is the source of my complaint.

That's the problem though. You cant put it in regular terms. Companies dont read regular, "Hey yo, dont steal our code without giving back." terms. Everything works with lawyer talk. Our world revolves around it. Thats why companies hire lawyers before entering into the GPL world or they consult with the FSF to spell out the terms for them. The FSF visits many companies and answers questions about source code, and IP. And I think your confused by RMS's stance on IP and copyright. It is not that he dislikes their basis completely, he knows they will still be around. What he mostly dislikes is their misuse by large corporations. Which is completely understandable. It is against the "original intent" of those systems the way companies today use them. Another quick point. You only have to release source to people you distribute your product to. If you sell a GPL product to 30 people then those 30 have the right to request the source. Hell you can even charge for the source! As a sur-charge for distribution of it. But you can absolutely not hide your source from the people you distribute it to.
Fact is though. There will always be one person who has a different opinion than yourself. That's ok. No one says GPL is the only way. The only thing to do is to 'agree to disagree'.