Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 18th Jan 2004 08:19 UTC
Oracle and SUN Some of the more experienced among the readers can surely configure CUPS with Samba by editing configuration files with closed eyes. This kind of exercise is useful and fun the first few times, but it can quickly become a mundane task if it has to repeated often. Wouldn't it be nice if we had a distribution that could do it near-automatically? In other words, wouldn't it be nice if we just used Xandros? And despite our natural resistance to use GUI for any kind of configuration, could we still love Xandros? Robert Storey investigates.
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Xandros!=OpenSource
by IP on Sun 18th Jan 2004 15:26 UTC

"Some of the more experienced among the readers can surely configure CUPS with Samba by editing configuration files with closed eyes. This kind of exercise is useful and fun the first few times, but it can quickly become a mundane task if it has to repeated often."
What is worng with scripts???

"Wouldn't it be nice if we had a distribution that could do it near-automatically? In other words, wouldn't it be nice if we just used Xandros? And despite our natural resistance to use GUI for any kind of configuration, could we still love Xandros?"
NO!!!
DistroWatch:

Xandros - a community player?

The first reviews of the recently released Xandros Desktop 2.0 are in and it is nice to see that the product continues to gather praise. With all its usability enhancements and innovative approach to desktop computing, Xandros Desktop has quite possibly done more than any other Linux company to bring our favourite operating system closer to non-technical users as a viable replacement for Windows. As such, Xandros deserves our admiration.

But product quality aside, there is one dark aspect of the company that is rarely mentioned in reviews: Xandros's involvement -- or lack, thereof -- in the Linux and Open Source Software developer community. It is a well-known fact that Red Hat employs a famous kernel developer, or that SUSE sponsors KDE and ALSA. Even some smaller Linux companies are actively contributing, a good example of which is Lindows.com's sponsorship of Gaim and other Open Source projects. These types of sponsorship deals benefit all of us - one doesn't need to be a Red Hat, SUSE or LindowsOS user to take advantage of the new features in the Linux kernel or the improved cross-platform compatibility in the latest version of the popular instant messenger. But what about Xandros? Besides the general "bug fix contributions" and a few proprietary, undistributable and closed-source applications, what exactly has Xandros done to contribute to the development of Linux and Free Software? Has it sponsored any Open Source project? Has it released any of its own work under GPL? No, as far as we know, it has not.

Given the above, should we, as a community of Linux users, support a company which bases its products on Linux and other Open Source Software without making any solid effort to contribute back? Or should we just accept that Xandros is a business, which needs to make a profit to survive and therefore is not expected to do us any favours? It would be nice if the company was capable of sponsoring third-party projects or willing to release some of its own code for the benefit of the rest of us, but is this a realistic expectation?