Linked by Andrew Barilla on Tue 10th Feb 2004 20:08 UTC
Linux After reading a discussion on DistroWatch asking if users were happy with their current distribution, I noticed a common thread of those who have had similar experiences as myself with juggling various Linux distributions. Like myself, they feel many Linux distributions are great, but no one quite feels like home. None of them quite fit the bill and they may even begin to think that every OS sucks.
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Re: A.K.H.
by Syntaxis on Wed 11th Feb 2004 11:22 UTC

"I've ran it twice in my life. Once around 4 years ago, and once last year."

Since last you used it, the devs have been encouraged to carry out all the really hardcore development and testing in the Experimental branch, in order to reduce the churn in Unstable. You can read the Release Manager's post on the subject here (http://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2003/debian-devel-ann...) if you're interested. Juicy quote: "The plan here is that you should upload the latest, release-quality packages to unstable; and the latest development packages to experimental." I believe general consensus is that it's having the desired effect.

"Both times I had numerous show stopping bugs and package dependancy problems."

Try installing apt-listbugs (http://packages.debian.org/unstable/admin/apt-listbugs).

It warns you if a package you're about to install has a severe bug filed against it. You can then fire up your browser, check out the bug in full and then take a view as to whether you still want to go ahead with the installation, or stick with your current version pending a fix. This pretty much eliminates the breakage factor.

"so many people claim debian unstable is in fact unstable, even the debian developers"

Most of the developers run Unstable. What they in fact say is that you shouldn't run Unstable unless you know what you're doing. If you're reasonably clued up, and take sensible precautions for good measure (regular backups, and a rescue CD to hand) there's really nothing to worry about.