Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 19th Oct 2004 16:55 UTC
Mono Project This article provides a tour through some Mono programs, along with details about how you can start experimenting with them yourself. Not all of the programs featured here are finished products, but they're all exciting and show off interesting aspects of Mono. Even more Mono applications can be found at GnomeFiles.org: We should add to the list the excellent PolarViewer and SportTracker (they go together), and of course, GCursor#, CSBoardGalaxium Messenger, SkyNET and GLyrics among others like Bless, fewnn, GFax, WoodPusher, CDCollect and Kurush.
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Oh really - can we just kill this meme because it's wrong. There are plenty of seriously large python projects.

http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-list/2004-March/213210.html

You might also have occasion to learn about Pyrex and
... well, I'm in the Trotskyite wing on this question.
It's not just that Python can work for large projects.
I sincerely regard it as an even *better* comparative
choice on large projects; C++ and Java, the usual com-
petition, show all sorts of blemishes when one scales
the size of the project. Python remains usable, even
at the high end.


Maybe we need to understand the differences between what is a 'systems programming language' where features such as static typing and explicit interfaces might be important, as opposed to RAD languages. As far as I can see, C# was designed as a systems programming language to implement components that were to be used in other more 'everyday' languages like Visual Basic (or Iron Python more recently) which feature dynamic typing.

I've used the dynamic language Objective-C on projects with 500k LOC, and I can confirm there was no problem with scaling at all.