Linked by Christian Paratschek on Tue 2nd Nov 2004 16:46 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu By all means, Ubuntu Linux and Canonical Ltd. have made a spectacular arrival on the Linux scene lately. The combination is like a dream come true for many, many Linux aficionados: tightly selected bleeding edge packages to focus the distribution on a single CD, corporate backing, 18 month support, that all sounds like a formidable package.
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@toby lehman:
by AdamW on Tue 2nd Nov 2004 22:11 UTC

for the six hundredth time this week, that's idiotic.

A .deb is a compressed file archive with some metadata. A .rpm is a compressed file archive with some metadata. They are functionally equivalent.

dpkg is a basic package management tool for .deb packages which will install and remove said packages and reference a database of which packages are installed. rpm is a basic package management tool for .rpm packages which will install and remove said packages and reference a database of which packages are installed. They are functionally equivalent.

apt-get is an advanced package management tool for .deb packages which will install and remove packages, and resolve dependencies for said operations if necessary. It can also retrieve packages from a correctly configured package source either locally or remotely through a wide variety of protocols. urpmi, yum and apt4rpm are advanced package management tools for .rpm packages which will install and remove packages, and resolve dependencies for said operations if necessary. They can also retrieve packages from a correctly configured package source either locally or remotely through a wide variety of protocols. They are functionally equivalent.

synaptic (for apt-get) is a GUI frontend to the apt-get package manager which allows graphical access to the most common functions performed at the command line through apt-get. rpmdrake and synaptic (for apt4rpm) are GUI frontends to urpmi and apt4rpm respectively which allow graphical access to the most common functions performed at the command line. They are functionally equivalent.

Get the picture yet?! Sheesh. If anyone from OSNews wants to post this, or a suitably prettied-up version, as an article, feel free. It might reduce the amount of sheer cluelessness in the universe by a thousandth of a percentage point or something.

(btw, does yum have a GUI?)