Linked by Uri Sharf on Mon 2nd May 2005 20:23 UTC
PC-BSD PC-BSD is a new FreeBSD 5.3 distribution, with a graphical installer and KDE 3.4 as its desktop. A new beta version was just released, and though I can't say I have much experience with FreeBSD, or any *BSD for that matter, I was curious enough to try it. And I'm glad I did. From a desktop user's point of view, completely oblivious to the many virtues and sound foundation of all things BSD, all I really ever wanted was an OS that is solid, easy to install and, well ... fun to work with.
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RE: packages
by molnarcs on Mon 2nd May 2005 22:32 UTC

You can't mix package and ports at the same time

Yes, you are right - but you can choose not to use ports at all, and go binary only if you wish to. Then there is a range of packages that get regular binary updates - though not all of them (btw, I thought that the binary repository only lags behind a few weeks - can't you specify a more current binary repository than the one for your specific RELEASE?) - and usually these are the packages users care for: openoffice, kde, gnome, etc.

How much you can mix packages and ports - well, that's not an easy question of course. Probably the less dependencies a package has, the more likely you can build it from source and use binary upgrades for the rest of the system. Perhaps it would be great if installing an older binary would not downgrade the rest of the packages if it is not necessary.

Also, there is a new charter for freebsd portmanagers. Announcment is here: http://www.FreeBSD.org/news/status/report-jan-2005-mar-2005.html#Po...

Charter: http://www.freebsd.org/portmgr/charter.html

What caught my attention:
The Ports Management Team has the following specific responsibilities:
Assure the integrity of the Ports Collection by managing commits to the ports portion of the FreeBSD CVS repository. This includes maintaining certain key files directly; running test builds of proposed large changes; and acting as arbiter over other commits.
Maintain the automated package building cluster, and make the resulting packages available for download by FreeBSD users.
Work with the FreeBSD Security team to insure that security problems are indentified and handled in a timely fashion.

As I said, I thought you can already do what the above passage says - but even if you can't, it might be possible in the near future.