Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 16th Jan 2003 03:04 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces One of the most important visual parts of any operating system is of course, the fonts. Many times users on the net have argued about bad quality fonts used (installed by default) on alternative OSes. For the companies or individuals who would like to resolve such issues and create original and high quality fonts for their OSes (and not just for OSes), I would like to introduce them to FontLab 4.5.1.
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Different worlds meet..
by Marc van Woerkom on Thu 16th Jan 2003 12:23 UTC

Like Eugenia wrote, fonts are very important for the appearance of an OS. If I look at Windows applikations before Windows 95, they look really ugly due to their inferior fonts. The same holds when I fire up a Java application and look how it gets rendered under Windows, Solaris or Linux. The notable difference between the apps is more or less the quality of the system fonts!

But how do we get improved fonts in our open source OSes?
There seem to exist two roads:
1. Pay some typographic expert to develop cool fonts
2. Educate those typically technical people, who are behind open source to be able to the task

This featured tool would be one ingredient for the do it your self approach. But I guess while this gives a nice tool which operates under the standards of professional type setting folks, this still leaves us with problem who to education the user to create taste- and useful fonts with tool.

Even Knuth, the inventor of TeX and METAFONT, got some help.
He had one of the greatest font designers around as help, Hermann Zapf. You can read this in Knuth's excellent book "Digital Typography".

I would really love to learn how to create nice fonts, but how can I learn this?
Is there any kind of lecture in typography out there?
As far as I can observate, the guys in that business learn it by creating lots of fonts themselves, constantly looking and other peoples fonts with professional eyes and have some access to experienced designers.

Regards,
Marc