posted by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Jul 2009 21:28 UTC, submitted by Kishe
IconThe story around The Pirate Bay acquisition seems to be developing fast. The torrent search engine was bought by Global Gaming Factory yesterday, and they promised to build a legal P2P distribution network where content providers and copyright holders get compensated. In an exclusive interview with the BBC, GGF's Hans Pandeya detailed the business plan they have in mind for TPB.

Buying The Pirate Bay is all well and good, of course, but the issue here is that as a legitimate company, Global Gaming Factory can't partake in activities that are illegal in some countries (Sweden, in any case). Consequently, even though they want to continue sharing files on TPB, it will have to be done in a legal manner. "We're a listed company so everything we do has to be legal; content providers need to be paid and have their wishes and demands met," Pandeya said.

So, what is the big golden plan? It's a bit vague, so let's just look at his words verbatim to avoid confusion:

More than half of all internet traffic is file sharing and P2P [peer-to-peer] traffic and buying Pirate Bay gives us one of the biggest sources of traffic. We can then use this massive network of file-sharers to help [internet service providers] reduce overload.

Let's say a popular song comes out. Rather than a million downloads from a site - which would cause a considerable strain on that ISP - we can take that song and put it out on P2P. The copyright holder still gets paid, the users still get their file, the ISP doesn't have a million people all grabbing a file and - for the users who share that song - a payment for putting that file on the P2P network.

I'm honestly not entirely sure what their train of thought is here. Sure, buying TPB gives them a massive amount of P2P users, but it's not like those users are tied or limited to TPB in any way. They'll jump ship to any of the other million torrent search engines in the blink of an eye.

However, the idea of file sharers getting paid is intriguing, but what exactly does this mean? Does this mean that if you download a few songs through a torrent, and then seed that torrent, you get paid? That sounds interesting, but also extremely complicated to put into practice.

Interesting, but I'm sceptical.

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