posted by Kroc Camen on Wed 6th Oct 2010 13:22 UTC
IconIn an e-mail to their announce mailing list, the The Document Foundation have shared details of their first week of public operation: "One full week has gone by since the announcement of The Document Foundation, and we would like to share some numbers with the people who have decided to follow us since the first day."

The e-mail, in full:

The Internet, October 6, 2010 - One full week has gone by since the announcement of The Document Foundation, and we would like to share some numbers with the people who have decided to follow us since the first day.

The beta of LibreOffice has been downloaded over 80.000 times. The infrastructure has expanded dramatically from 25 to 45 working mirrors in 25 countries (in every continent), including islands in the Pacific Ocean. This number is close to half the mirrors achieved by OpenOffice.org during ten years of history of the project.

People have started to contribute to the code, suggesting features, committing patches and filing bugs. In just one week, around 80 code contributions (patches, and direct commits) have been accepted in LibreOffice from a total of 27 volunteers, several of them newly-won, with around 100 developers hanging out on the #libreoffice irc channel which is buzzing with activity (around 14,000 messages sent).

Turning to the wider community, 2.000 people have subscribed to the list announce@ to keep up with the latest TDF news, and 300 people to the discussion list discuss@, where there has been an average of 100 messages per day.

To round up the numbers, there are nearly 600 people following TDF tweets, over 150 following the identi.ca TDF account, and over 1.000 fans on Facebook. The traffic on the server has been in the region of 500 GB.

In its only official response to the creation of the Foundation, Oracle has stated: “Oracle is investing substantial resources in OpenOffice.org. With more than one hundred million users, we believe OpenOffice.org is the most advanced, most feature rich open source implementation and will strongly encourage the Open Office community to continue to contribute through www.openoffice.org.”

The Foundation understands from this that Oracle has no immediate plans to support the Foundation, or to transfer community assets such as the OpenOffice.org trademark. However, the Foundation hopes this position will change as the company sees the volunteer community - an essential component of OpenOffice’s past success - swing its support behind the new Foundation. In the meantime, the Foundation will continue software development under the LibreOffice brand.

As expected, a totally blank-faced reply from Oracle, communicating how little interest they have in a warm and friendly ‘community’.

Overall, a resounding success and I hope to see rapid improvement in LibreOffice over the OpenOffice.org. With these numbers, I find it hard to see community interest in OpenOffice.org continuing for much longer, especially if Oracle want to be hard-nosed about communication.

TDF, and LibreOffice, I have just one thing to say to you: fix the update mechanism. All of your improvements are completely worthless if users can’t get updates. The update mechanism of OpenOffice is so terrible, I have never seen a user using any other version than what was originally installed. 1.3, 2.1, I’ve seen them all. Don’t ship a 1.0 without an update at least as good as Firefox (download updates in background, install automatically upon next start).

Best wishes,
Kroc Camen.

(With thanks to lemur2 for the submission, even though I didn’t use your text)

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