Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Mar 2006 21:32 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless In a preview of Tuesday afternoon's demonstration, Intel Marketing Director Brad Graff showed CNET News.com several of the Ultra Mobile PC devices, including an example of the kind of hardware that will ship in the next few weeks as part of the Microsoft effort. As earlier reported, the first devices have a 7-inch touch screen, standard x86 processors, and can run full versions of desktop operating systems including the Windows XP variant being used for Origami.
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RE[2]: blogged about it
by hobgoblin on Wed 8th Mar 2006 01:22 UTC in reply to "blogged about it"
hobgoblin
Member since:
2005-07-06

two things:

first of all, this baby runs full version windows. this means people can take their exiting software (including games) and run them on it. this allows for a much quicker uptake.

second, you image link (to a google search) includes images of the nokia 770. from what i read, this device have not flopped. hell, even nokia was surprised about the interest.

why?

its running a full linux system. it even allows more or less rapid porting of gnome apps. iirc, even gaim is allready available on it. and with a bluetooth keyboard (complete with drivers, supplyed by the community) you have a very potent tool in your pocket.

and from the looks of it, its even smaller then the "origami" device presented by intel and microsoft.

so its not so much about money as it is using existing marketshare to get a new device out (hell, antitrust?).

so you dont need money directly, but you need to get noticed. and you need software. a platform without software is dead in the water.

the origami have the enormous windows "empire" behind it. the 770 have the linux comunity backing it all the way. what did the BE and QNX devices have?

so in the end its not so much about money as it is about "community"...

btw, why not "blog" here on osnews ;) why do it on slashdot? and if your going to do it on slashdot, allow people to comment on it there ;)

Edited 2006-03-08 01:38

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: blogged about it
by Brendan on Wed 8th Mar 2006 04:59 in reply to "RE[2]: blogged about it"
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

first of all, this baby runs full version windows. this means people can take their exiting software (including games) and run them on it. this allows for a much quicker uptake.

Are you sure about that? For example, any software that does "Press any key to continue" is going to be a problem, and writing a word document by cutting and pasting words from a dictionary might be a bit hard (assuming there's a fast alternative to "control+C" and "control+V").

I don't know - maybe there'll be a virtual keyboard on the screen where you can touch the virtual keys, but then the virtual keyboard will probably take up most of the screen making it fairly hard see what you're doing.

What it really needs is software designed to work without a keyboard, but I can't think of much here - a few games and a web browser (as long as you don't go want to reply on forums, etc).

Perhaps speech recognition might be a viable alternative - otherwise handwriting a letter might be easier than sending an email...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: blogged about it
by hobgoblin on Wed 8th Mar 2006 22:34 in reply to "RE[3]: blogged about it"
hobgoblin Member since:
2005-07-06

ok, so there are some issues like that. but still, those a relative minor as they can have the 5-way thumb button (or whatever) on the side register as the four arrow keys and the enter key on a normal keyboard, problem solved.

cut, copy & paste? programable hotkeys maybe? i dont know but it looks like there are some buttons on that thing.

allso, most software that have that allso have them as toolbar buttons, or menu options...

Reply Parent Score: 1