Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 20th Mar 2006 07:13 UTC
General Development All the data stored in a Python program is built around the concept of an object. Objects include fundamental data types such as numbers, strings, lists, and dictionaries. It's also possible to create user-defined objects in the form of classes or extension types. This chapter describes the Python object model and provides an overview of the built-in data types.
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RE[5]: namespace pollution
by Soulbender on Tue 21st Mar 2006 08:02 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: namespace pollution"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

"Pretty much every IT department in the world worth their salt uses either C++, Java or .Net (ColdFusion has a huge presense as well) for application development. "

What part of the world do you live in? Pretty much every IT department worth their salt uses either PHP, Perl, Python or .Net/ASP. C++ is a complete joke outside of building small hobbyish websites.

Edited 2006-03-21 08:03

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: namespace pollution
by jayson.knight on Tue 21st Mar 2006 08:27 in reply to "RE[5]: namespace pollution"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

I live in the real world of corporate IT.

I've never seen a reputable IT dept use PHP for anything. It has its place, but corp IT isn't one of them. C++ would never be used for a web application (well, maybe ATL if they were very ambitious (and there was an EXTREME need for performance), but .Net would get comparable performance at a fraction of the dev time), but is still the de facto for mission critical non-web based apps where pure performance is the driving factor and the stakeholders have the funds to dole out for the extra time it takes to write apps in C++. Perl and Python? Perhaps for small apps, but these languages are used more as glue to tie larger apps together and are not used to build an entire application...not in IT at least.

The point is that corp IT depts employ very strict guidelines surrounding what frameworks can be installed on servers/workstations. They almost always go with professionally supported environments, like Java and .Net (and the various C++ compilers) so that if anything breaks, they can be guaranteed a fix.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: namespace pollution
by Soulbender on Tue 21st Mar 2006 08:53 in reply to "RE[6]: namespace pollution"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"I live in the real world of corporate IT."
So do I, yet my experience is entirely different.
Oh well, that's how it is.

"so that if anything breaks, they can be guaranteed a fix."

I think you mean "so that there's an outside scapegoat to pin the blame on" since rarely is a fix "guaranteed".

Reply Parent Score: 1