Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 20th Mar 2006 07:13 UTC
General Development All the data stored in a Python program is built around the concept of an object. Objects include fundamental data types such as numbers, strings, lists, and dictionaries. It's also possible to create user-defined objects in the form of classes or extension types. This chapter describes the Python object model and provides an overview of the built-in data types.
Thread beginning with comment 106291
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[7]: namespace pollution
by Soulbender on Tue 21st Mar 2006 08:53 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: namespace pollution"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

"I live in the real world of corporate IT."
So do I, yet my experience is entirely different.
Oh well, that's how it is.

"so that if anything breaks, they can be guaranteed a fix."

I think you mean "so that there's an outside scapegoat to pin the blame on" since rarely is a fix "guaranteed".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: namespace pollution
by jayson.knight on Tue 21st Mar 2006 09:13 in reply to "RE[7]: namespace pollution"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

Yeah, I guess that's how it is. I still stand by my original post though...companies want guarantees that if something goes wrong, there's a formal channel to fix it.

In an effort to keep this civilized... ;-)

By using frameworks that are backed by companies (in this case Java/Sun and .Net/MS), if something goes wrong it isn't about finding a scapegoat, it's about getting the issue fixed. Period. Placing blame has no place in the workplace, who cares who broke it...just fix it. Both of these companies are very good to their customers if either A) the bug is due to something the customer has introduced or B) the bug is due to something in the framework itself.

If a mission critical system writtin in [insert some OSS language here] goes down, a fix is needed ASAP. With formally supported platforms (regardless of the cost to fix it, this should be part of IT's budget) this would be a matter of hours. With OSS languages, it could potentially take days (and there aren't any formal lines of support), which is unacceptable in the IT realm. In IT, downtime == monetary loss.

Placing blame is secondary to getting the root issue fixed (actually placing blame should never happen period...mistakes happen). Companies want reassurance first and foremost.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: namespace pollution
by Soulbender on Tue 21st Mar 2006 09:26 in reply to "RE[8]: namespace pollution"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"Placing blame has no place in the workplace, who cares who broke it...just fix it."

You are blessed with sane middle-management ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1