Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Mar 2006 00:07 UTC
Novell and Ximian Novell is talking to a number of OEMs about getting its upcoming SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 preinstalled on the hardware systems they ship. But while Ron Hovsepian, Novell's president and chief operating officer, said the company had nothing to announce in this regard at its annual BrainShare conference here, Novell is talking to a number of key vendors like Dell in this regard. "I know there is an opportunity here and we are working on the how and the when," he said in a media and analyst question and answer session. The delay of Vista could not have come at a better time for Novell, in this regard.
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RE: Hehehe
by grat on Fri 24th Mar 2006 13:38 UTC in reply to "Hehehe"
grat
Member since:
2006-02-02

Assume I'm a company and I wanna buy software (OS) for our computers (client side ones). Now in one corner is classic MS products which I know, we're familiar with, which have all the software necessary for regular office use. And there's a contender which is also preinstalled and also charge money, without all software on the market. Geeee that's a tough nut to crack.

Now add a central management console that allows you to push out updates, lock down the desktop, and monitor those systems, without crippling them.

Novell and Dell are also combining Zenworks with OpenManage to produce a management system-- I realize OpenManage is primarily for servers, but there's no reason not to expand it to business desktops.

Finally, from an IT manager's point of view, having a desktop that's largely immune to 99.9% of the virii, worms, and trojans out there, eliminates a large percentage of support issues. Worst case, you restore the user's home directory from backups, because that's all they were able to trash.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Hehehe
by Haicube on Fri 24th Mar 2006 14:32 in reply to "RE: Hehehe"
Haicube Member since:
2005-08-06

"Finally, from an IT manager's point of view, having a desktop that's largely immune to 99.9% of the virii, worms, and trojans out there, eliminates a large percentage of support issues. Worst case, you restore the user's home directory from backups, because that's all they were able to trash."

Adding functionality means adding hazards, nothing new about that. I guess my original post got voted down because critisizing Linux is like critizing Stalin, you get shot!

In a company, the computer functions as a tool, a tool to perform some line of duty. IT people seem to forget about this. Let's say the sales people in your organisation, they wanna sync their mobiles with their Address book. in Windows, no problem, in Suse, it might work. Let's say you're in economy, yummy, I hear Suse has some great accountant software... probably at least the same amount of them as Windows.

So if you have to administer a lot of windows boxes, it's probably easier unifying stuff rather than scattering the amount of systems you have. The above was just 2 examples to point out what I'm saying.

If you can't have a network where you skip Outlook and IE, I'm not really sure why you're a sysadmin in the first place, because THAT will relieve you of about 90% of the viruses. Besides, there is a reason why a lot of them Anti virus packages start popping up for Linux as well... a stupid user is a stupid user.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Hehehe
by morglum666 on Fri 24th Mar 2006 14:38 in reply to "RE: Hehehe"
morglum666 Member since:
2005-07-06

"Now add a central management console that allows you to push out updates, lock down the desktop, and monitor those systems, without crippling them. "

Active directory? Software update server?

Its all out there for windows networks. Easy to install, well supported. Free with the product.

You mentioned some good products that are similiar, however I strongly doubt they can match active directory for capability. I'm always surprised to see the comments about windows viruses, as any company I have ever worked for rarely has any issues whatsoever with them.

Yes, some sales guys will open anything. But that's why every server, desktop has anti virus and mail is scanned inbound and outbound, combined with firewall and IDS type of devices.

Viruses arn't a day to day issue for any company I have ever worked for.

Linux's challenge is proving more capability, with equal or less suffering (ease of use), ability to support, etc. At this point I see linux as a good windows 98 alternative, but dismal compared to XP.


- Morglum

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Hehehe
by raver31 on Fri 24th Mar 2006 15:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Hehehe"
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

spoken like a true mcp

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Hehehe
by LanRx on Fri 24th Mar 2006 15:24 in reply to "RE[2]: Hehehe"
LanRx Member since:
2006-02-22

Active directory and software update server are both second class citizens in comparison to eDirectory and ZENworks Patch Management (Patchlink Update). They're not even in the same league.

As far as the capability of AD, it's alright, but bound by its own constraints. Replication weaknesses, replica management, non-standard implementation of LDAP which renders means that your CN/UID/sAMAccountName is bound to a uniqueness constraint not within LDAP, but within the Kerberos realm.

Some of these issues are offset by benefit. Kerberos IS a good authentication protocol. I can't take that away from it. But with the AD implementation, it renders the product far less scalable, which is bad for businesses.

Windows has its place...just not in the datacenter ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1