Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Mar 2006 23:36 UTC, submitted by ma_d
Windows Ars is contradicting the 60% claim made earlier today, stating: "Reportedly, the Media Center code in the OS is in shambles, and needs to be saved by the Xbox code team. Curiosity piqued, I contacted my usual sources. In short, the story is an extreme exaggeration. I suppose this much is obvious from the mere fact that what was once a late November shipping date has now moved to January 2007: would the revelation that more than half of the code is in need of repair only translate into a two month delay? Of course not. I suppose the cynic could still invest in this rumor by arguing that the delay will stretch into 2007, but that has yet to be seen, and it really amounts to FUD at this point."
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Huh?
by youknowmewell on Sat 25th Mar 2006 00:10 UTC
youknowmewell
Member since:
2005-07-08

All it said was, "My sources say that's an exaggeration." The author doesn't go into any details. However, the claim that 60% needs to be rewritten is also unsubstantiated. So the rumor is not dispelled, but is still rumor.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Huh?
by ma_d on Sat 25th Mar 2006 00:40 in reply to "Huh?"
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

I'll take Ken Fisher's published word for it ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Huh?
by Jody on Sat 25th Mar 2006 01:41 in reply to "Huh?"
Jody Member since:
2005-06-30

It has taken forever to get Vista as far as it is now and you think it is possible for MS to redisign, plan, rewrite, and test 60% of the entire Vista product inside of 2 months? lets not forget Vista was not a ground up rewrite of Windows in the first place, I dont know the % but I can assure you that a great deal of it is likely reused code.

A 60% rewite would be delayed in years, not months.

edit:

This would mean rewriting nearly 30 million lines of code in 2 months.

Edited 2006-03-25 01:46

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Huh?
by kaiwai on Sat 25th Mar 2006 09:16 in reply to "Huh?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

All it said was, "My sources say that's an exaggeration." The author doesn't go into any details. However, the claim that 60% needs to be rewritten is also unsubstantiated. So the rumor is not dispelled, but is still rumor.

Aye? he has already dismissed it; 60% doesn't need to be re-written, and the issue has to do with security and third party vendors, and for obvious reasons, the sources aren't going to release the specfic information relating to the problem as it would reveal what development group the source is - thus, compromising that individuals employment.

Lets remember that third parties also work with Microsoft on Window as well, so for all we know, the third party or parties could have found a security issue, and thus, they need time to possibly re-write how something is handled; what ever the case, it appears that things are going well in development circles, but at the same time, the stakes are high as there is alot riding on the success of this product when compared to others.

Windows XP was a no-brainer, it was the move from 9x to Windows NT, the stability argument alone was enough to make people move - now that we're in the Windows NT zone, its going to be alot harder for Microsoft to sell Windows Vista, sure, there are some great technical enhancements, but its about marketing those advancements in such a way that actually gets the end user interested in upgrading to it without daunting them with the overly complex ideas that tend to come with information technology.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Huh?
by druiloor on Sat 25th Mar 2006 10:00 in reply to "RE: Huh?"
druiloor Member since:
2006-02-01

> Windows XP was a no-brainer, it was the move from 9x
> to Windows NT,

Well, maybe for home-desktop users it was. It certainly wasn't for a bunch of companys i know about (as they migrated from NT to 2000, and from Unix and Netware to Linux.)

Gratest problem with XP is the unacceptable conditions in the EULA.TXT it ships with, similar to:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/eula.mspx

> the stability argument alone was enough to make
> people move -

No, i think, people want to keep up with the Johnsons.

Reply Parent Score: 1