Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 26th Mar 2006 23:53 UTC
Mac OS X Informit.com's very own Mac Reference Guide, Owen Linzmayer, again risks the slings and arrows of Apple's most ardent admirers with another look at how Tiger rubs him wrong. Take a look at "Ten More Things I Hate About Mac OS X" to see if you recognize any of your own pet peeves. Elsewhere on the same site, this chapter covers the initial installation and setup of Mac OS X Tiger, either as a fresh installation, or as an upgrade from a previous version. Detailed instructions are given to help you set your Mac up just how you want it.
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RE: More peeves
by PowerMacX on Mon 27th Mar 2006 03:49 UTC in reply to "More peeves"
PowerMacX
Member since:
2005-11-06

9) Cut doesn't appear in context menus for files/directories.
Cut & Paste is the "Windows way", Mac favors the drag & drop approach. But I agree with you on this one, in many situations drag & drop doesn't work so well, the option should be there.

10) No tree view in Finder. A tree view makes navigating file systems much more efficient. Especially when you have a couple of 250GB disks and ~1 million files. No Mac user should have to pay for a 3rd party program to do this. Explorer does it well. Xfe does it well. So does Konq. Why cant Finder?

Because, IMHO Finder does it right ;)

You have three view modes: regular icon view, list view and column view.

- Column view is a lot more efficient for quickly navigating your folder hierarchy, a lot faster than manually expanding each folder on a "regular" folder tree view.

- List view as implemented in the Finder is actually a combination of what other systems call list view and a tree view. You can expand folders and subfolders just like in a regular tree view, but instead of just seeing the folders in one panel and the files in the other, you can see them together. If I want to quickly compare the contents of two folders with a few files, I can simply expand them both. With a regular tree view, I'm forced to see the files in a different panel, so I can only see the files in one folder at a time.

Also, don't forget you have the "drag and hold" method, that lets you drop a file as deep as you want in the folder hierarchy (the folders open automatically in sequence, after a short period of time, which you can customize).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: More peeves
by MikeGA on Mon 27th Mar 2006 10:00 in reply to "RE: More peeves"
MikeGA Member since:
2005-07-22

Oops, I'd forgotten one could use list view as if it were tree view. Although it does show everything, not just folders like Explorer does.

Also, with the "drag and hold" method (spring-loaded-folders really), you can also hit space whilst hovering over a folder, to open it up instantly.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: More peeves
by BladeMelbourne on Mon 27th Mar 2006 12:33 in reply to "RE: More peeves"
BladeMelbourne Member since:
2005-07-10

Cut & Paste is the "Windows way", Mac favors the drag & drop approach. But I agree with you on this one, in many situations drag & drop doesn't work so well, the option should be there.

It's not just the Windows way - it is a pretty common approach. Says me who installed FC5 with Nautilus ;-)

10) No tree view in Finder.

Because, IMHO Finder does it right ;)

You have three view modes: regular icon view, list view and column view.


I'm not a Windows fanboy, but Windows has 4 modes - and it is more efficient than Finder - particularly in list mode. Some Linux file managers present a similar view to Finder ($home, etc) but also have a tree view to compensate.

- Column view is a lot more efficient for quickly navigating your folder hierarchy, a lot faster than manually expanding each folder on a "regular" folder tree view.
I have to disagree. It is ok in some senarios, but not many that I use.

- List view as implemented in the Finder is actually a combination of what other systems call list view and a tree view. You can expand folders and subfolders just like in a regular tree view, but instead of just seeing the folders in one panel and the files in the other, you can see them together. If I want to quickly compare the contents of two folders with a few files, I can simply expand them both. With a regular tree view, I'm forced to see the files in a different panel, so I can only see the files in one folder at a time.

This might be useful to you, but it isn't to me. 99% of my file operations are move or trash. Usually moving to a removal drive... with an organised hierarchy established with more than 10 years of data and structure.


Also, don't forget you have the "drag and hold" method, that lets you drop a file as deep as you want in the folder hierarchy (the folders open automatically in sequence, after a short period of time, which you can customize).

I found this by accident - yes it is neat (and visually too with the spring effect). But it isn't as convenient if you are going back and forth between directories, trying to find the most suitable location.

At the end of the day, the file operations I complete at work numerous times a day on Windows are far quicker and more efficient than the equivalent on a Mac. It is foolish to assume that all files owned by a person reside on the Desktop, or in $home, Applications, Documents, Movies, Music or Pictures. This is compounded when you connect a USB drive.

Finder also makes it more difficult to open a second instance - especially when clicking the Finder icon in the dock. Not impressed.

I guess what I am saying is that I can accomplish more with Explorer/Xfe/etc. quicker than can be done in Finder. This can be done without the keyboard too.

If 10.5 doesn't have a tree view, I'm going to replace OS X with Fedora.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: More peeves
by PowerMacX on Tue 28th Mar 2006 06:16 in reply to "RE[2]: More peeves"
PowerMacX Member since:
2005-11-06

it is foolish to assume that all files owned by a person reside on the Desktop, or in $home, Applications, Documents, Movies, Music or Pictures.

Yes, the sidebar is not a tree view if that was your point. ;)
It has a different purpose: it's designed to have your most used folders readily available. You can add more simply by dragging them there and/or remove the existing ones if you don't have a use for them (just drag them out). Note that adding or removing a folder there does not change the actual location of a folder, it is just an alias.

This is compounded when you connect a USB drive.

Why? USB drives, CD-RWs, mounted drives in general, appear on the sidebar of each window, they are always easily accessible. You can configure what exactly shows up in "Finder > Preferences..." in the Sidebar tab.

Finder also makes it more difficult to open a second instance - especially when clicking the Finder icon in the dock. Not impressed.

Err... did you try command-n? Also, if you want to open a folder in a different window, just command-double click on it. I have my mouse click wheel mapped to command-click for this purpose.
Another option is switching the window to "spatial view" by clicking on the top-right button in the title bar. Or, if you want to keep the standard window look (sidebar & toolbar), go to "Finder > Preferences" and in the General tab select "Always open folders in a new window".

If 10.5 doesn't have a tree view, I'm going to replace OS X with Fedora.

Well, Apple posted job openings looking for people to work on the new Finder for 10.5, so maybe it will ;) A very basic option I would like to see added to it is the choice to put folders first in the sort order of all views.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: More peeves
by phoenix on Tue 28th Mar 2006 06:39 in reply to "RE[2]: More peeves"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

If 10.5 doesn't have a tree view, I'm going to replace OS X with Fedora.

Why would you replace an entire OS for a single problem in an application? Just install a third-party file manager.

Would you switch Linux distros if Fedora decided to not ship Nautilus by default?

Reply Parent Score: 1