Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 28th Mar 2006 21:49 UTC
OpenBSD "Theo de Raadt is the project leader for OpenBSD, a Unix-like operating system. We spoke with Theo about the upcoming release of OpenBSD, 3.9, the financial state of the project, and about companies that profit from free software without contributing back."
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RE: I read the interview
by Soulbender on Wed 29th Mar 2006 04:32 UTC in reply to "I read the interview"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

"Theo is complaining that Sun is using the BSD licence as it was intended."

This has nothing to do with the license. Stop trolling for flamewars.

Reply Parent Score: 4

v RE[2]: I read the interview
by Angel--Fr@gzill@ on Wed 29th Mar 2006 05:39 in reply to "RE: I read the interview"
RE[3]: I read the interview
by dukeinlondon on Wed 29th Mar 2006 08:15 in reply to "RE[2]: I read the interview"
dukeinlondon Member since:
2005-07-06

Indeed.

Nobody pays if they don't have to. In a corporate environment, it's hard to justify spending on products with a price tag, encrypted license keys et al. Now try to justify spending when you don't have to !

Theo should tap in the sponsoring budget of tech companies, not their 'good tech citizenship' budget.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: I read the interview
by Soulbender on Wed 29th Mar 2006 08:32 in reply to "RE[2]: I read the interview"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"I also do not understand that others post claiming similar views are quickly accused of trolling by the BSD zealots... Sure there are GNU zealots, but if they prove their views with logic and empiric demostrations, why they should not do it?"

Because it is trolling. The license, be it BSD or (L)GPL, has nothing to do with financing. They only deal with the freedom of the source and has no provisioning WHATSOEVER for licensing fees. I'm sure a lot of people find discussing the pros and cons of the different licenses fascinating but it still has nothing to do with the money side of things. Using the GPL, for example, does not stop people from using your code and not giving back money or otherwise help your project financially

Edited 2006-03-29 08:35

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I read the interview
by Soulbender on Wed 29th Mar 2006 09:28 in reply to "RE[2]: I read the interview"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"Has anyone heard about the Lemmings in Scandinavia, throwing themselves to the death from the cliffs... That is what happens when your model is not substainable!"

Lemmings dont actually do this. It's just another popular but untrue myth. Maybe you should read up on the animal kingdom.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I read the interview
by Temcat on Wed 29th Mar 2006 10:13 in reply to "RE: I read the interview"
Temcat Member since:
2005-10-18

It has EVERYTHING to do with license. With BSD license, which was their OWN choice, nobody owes them monetary copensation for their efforts, and yet Theo whines that the project doesn't get anything in return. Sure, some might donate them money out of pure generosity, and that will be a Good Thing(TM) - but REQUIRING generosity is stupid and childish.

Here's the relevant long quote for those who haven't bothered to RTFA:

-----------------------------------------------
If I add up everything we have ever gotten in exchange for our efforts with OpenSSH, it might amount to $1,000. This all came from individuals. For our work on OpenSSH, companies using OpenSSH have never given us a cent. What about companies that incorporate OpenSSH directly into their products, saving themselves millions of dollars? Companies such as Cisco, Sun, SGI, HP, IBM, Siemens, a raft of medium-sized firewall companies -- we have not received a cent. Or from Linux vendors? Not a cent.

Of course we did not set out to create OpenSSH for the money -- we purposely made it completely free so that the "telnet infrastructure" of the 1980s would die. But it sure is sad that none of these companies return even a fraction of value in kind.

If you want to judge any entity particularly harshly, judge Sun. Yearly they hold interoperability events, for NFS and other protocols, and they include SSH implementation tests as well. Twice we asked them to cover the travel and accommodation costs for a developer to come to their event, and they refused. Considering that their SunSSH is directly based on our code, that is just flat out insulting. Shame on you Sun, shame, shame, shame.

I will say it here -- if an OpenSSH hole is found that applies to SunSSH, Sun will not be informed. Or maybe that has happened already.
-----------------------------------------------

Sun does NOT owe them anything.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: I read the interview
by miscz on Wed 29th Mar 2006 15:09 in reply to "RE[2]: I read the interview"
miscz Member since:
2005-07-17

Sure, they didn't break the law. They don't owe them anything. But they are still jerks, Sun relies on some guys work and they could at least return a favor.

Reply Parent Score: 1