Linked by Adam S on Wed 5th Apr 2006 12:57 UTC, submitted by Thomas Ganter
Mac OS X "More and more people are buying and loving Macs. To make this choice simply irresistible, Apple will include technology in the next major release of Mac OS X, Leopard, that lets you install and run the Windows XP operating system on your Mac. Called Boot Camp (for now), you can download a public beta today." My Take: Is this possible? We've been talking about virtualization on Leopard for a few days now, but did anyone see this coming?
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Most people don't get it
by Hae-Yu on Wed 5th Apr 2006 16:20 UTC
Hae-Yu
Member since:
2006-01-12

I'm reading a lot of the comments and for a site that usually has smart people, a lot of you don't get it.

Why would they do this?
The #1 reason most people won't switch over to Apple is that they have to buy/ relearn all new software. Interviewing anyone who has really thought about switching and this is the show stopper. The Mac platform doesn't have as large a warez ecosystem as Windows, and most regular users don't know about warez anyway. So they look at the cost of rebuying all their apps and/ or relearning new apps because app x doesn't have an Apple release. This is more expensive than the hardware.

This benefits Apple greatly and has a marginal benefit for MS. Dual booting - and providing the partitioning tools, boot loader, and drivers - allows users to painlessly switch without sacrificing their functionality. Most serious users (as in people who really live off their boxes) who own Macs also have a Windows box around. I'd say @ 60% but that's just people I know.

MS benefits in that they can sell a few extra retail copies.

If you look at the functionality offered & the FAQs on the Boot Camp pages, Apple is offering broad enough basic functionality to perform Task X in Windows. Things that aren't geared toward that - in general anything that's a Bell & Whistle - isn't supported. You won't get too comfortable working on the Windows partition, and it will give you a nudge to encourage you to work out of OS X. Besides 3rd parties can make up all those extras if someone seriously wants to run Windows as the primary OS.

Apple loses nothing. This doesn't make them look bad and it isn't an embarrassment for them. It just eases the transition to Apple.

With MS releasing Virtual Server free along with supporting major Linux distros and now this, I don't know if I can stand all the OS free love running around.

ascheinberg
I've used (logitech & MS) Wireless Mouse & Keys for years on Windows and I've never had a problem with Windows recognizing them on install or boot.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Most people don't get it
by Adam S on Wed 5th Apr 2006 17:12 in reply to "Most people don't get it"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

I've used (logitech & MS) Wireless Mouse & Keys for years on Windows and I've never had a problem with Windows recognizing them on install or boot.

IR wireless may be supported, but integrated Bluetooth is not. Anything that plugs in to an dongle with an adapter that recognizes a device is probably not really "wireless," but rather, mimics a non-wireless device.

Reply Parent Score: 5