Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 10th Apr 2006 13:53 UTC
Legal Jason O'Grady, who runs PowerPage.org, one of the websites Apple is forcing to disclose sources, has reacted to all of it at ZDNet. "My position on the Asteroid postings is that I didn't steal the information and I didn't ask for it. Someone volunteered it to me and it looked credible, so I posted it. It wasn't marked confidential, trade secret or any such thing but it looked legit to me, so I ran it. When Apple later asked me to remove it, I complied. Apple feels that independent online journalists are not protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and that a journalist's confidential communications and sources should be exposed to them or any large corporation that doesn't like what they publish - at will. I think that this is completely wrong on several levels."
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Burden
by eKstreme on Mon 10th Apr 2006 18:22 UTC
eKstreme
Member since:
2005-07-06

If I was the judge, I would tell Apple to stop being lazy and do an internal investigation to find out who leaked the info. Apple has a problem with one of its employees, not the journalist. The journalist did not sign an NDA and therefore did not breach any law. The best Apple can do is ask the journalist politely about his source.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Burden
by ronaldst on Mon 10th Apr 2006 18:32 in reply to "Burden"
ronaldst Member since:
2005-06-29

If I was the judge, I'd tell the fellas to get a life and stop leeching off Apple. Stealing is wrong. Selling stolen stuff is also wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Burden
by dr_gonzo on Mon 10th Apr 2006 19:46 in reply to "RE: Burden"
dr_gonzo Member since:
2005-07-06

Nobody stole anything from Apple. An Apple employee breached his NDA with Apple. The journalist published the information that this employee gave him.

Reply Parent Score: 1