Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 18th Apr 2006 17:49 UTC
Linux Efforts to bring glitzy new graphics to Linux are fueling an old conflict: Does proprietary software belong in open-source Linux? The issue involves software modules called drivers, which plug into the kernel at the heart of the open-source operating system. Drivers let software communicate with hardware such as network adapters, hard drives and video cards.
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RE[8]: My answer is YES
by sappyvcv on Tue 18th Apr 2006 22:28 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: My answer is YES"
sappyvcv
Member since:
2005-07-06

And OS X is inteded to run on a lot less hardware than Linux. It supports exactly what users need to run it. There's a huge difference.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: My answer is YES
by cr8dle2grave on Tue 18th Apr 2006 22:35 in reply to "RE[8]: My answer is YES"
cr8dle2grave Member since:
2005-07-11

Which brings me to my point: it's about user expectations, not hardware support.

Mac user's don't expect their Mac to support every periphereal under the sun, so why should Linux users expect the same? I surmise that actual Linux users don't actually, that point of view is one that is usually espoused by Windows users when giving reasons for why they won't switch to Linux. Which, for what it's worth, I consider to be a perfectly valid reason.

It's not a lack of hardware support which holding back Linux on the desktop, but the expectation of some potential users that Linux be a seemless drop in replacement for Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[10]: My answer is YES
by sappyvcv on Tue 18th Apr 2006 22:43 in reply to "RE[9]: My answer is YES"
sappyvcv Member since:
2005-07-06

It's not a lack of hardware support which holding back Linux on the desktop, but the expectation of some potential users that Linux be a seemless drop in replacement for Windows.

And where does the blame lie?

Linux hardware support is good, I won't argue that. But this is a roadblock that is hurting it. It could gain a leg on Microsoft if the leaders weren't so adament about everything being "pure" and "Free".

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[10]: My answer is YES
by SpasmaticSeacow on Wed 19th Apr 2006 15:50 in reply to "RE[9]: My answer is YES"
SpasmaticSeacow Member since:
2006-02-17

That's not a fair comparison. Save for USB and firewire devices, Macs by design support a very small minority of hardware. In limiting supported hardware, Mac can assure the quality of that hardware's support for the OS.

Reply Parent Score: 2