Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 18th Apr 2006 17:49 UTC
Linux Efforts to bring glitzy new graphics to Linux are fueling an old conflict: Does proprietary software belong in open-source Linux? The issue involves software modules called drivers, which plug into the kernel at the heart of the open-source operating system. Drivers let software communicate with hardware such as network adapters, hard drives and video cards.
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RE[9]: My answer is YES
by Finalzone on Tue 18th Apr 2006 23:08 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: My answer is YES"
Finalzone
Member since:
2005-07-06

Apple system is a specialized PC so the point still stand. Only difference is the use of dedicated drivers for that system.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[10]: My answer is YES
by sappyvcv on Tue 18th Apr 2006 23:10 in reply to "RE[9]: My answer is YES"
sappyvcv Member since:
2005-07-06

And you were talking about installing it on a plain PC.

The point is that Mac users don't have to worry about drivers. Everything just works, better than Windows or Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[11]: My answer is YES
by archiesteel on Tue 18th Apr 2006 23:12 in reply to "RE[10]: My answer is YES"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

And yet OSX market share is about the same as Linux market share, contradicting your earlier argument...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[11]: My answer is YES
by Finalzone on Tue 18th Apr 2006 23:24 in reply to "RE[10]: My answer is YES"
Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

You were talking about "hardware support out of box" which I pointed out those hardwares are supported/customized for Apple system. I took plain PC example to show you that your statement does not apply outside Apple hardware support.
I have seen Fedora, Yellow Dog and Ubuntu running smoothly on Apple system minus wireless (manufacturers problem) displaying better portability of Linux (kernel) than Apple own's.

Reply Parent Score: 2