Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 12th May 2006 20:31 UTC, submitted by Joel Dahl
FreeBSD Linux may soon have a stronger open-source competitor on the desktop if FreeBSD's plans come to fruition. FreeBSD developer Scott Long told ZDNet UK on Thursday that the operating system, descended from the Unix derivative BSD, is "quickly approaching" feature parity with Linux. "Lots of work is going on to make FreeBSD more friendly on the desktop," Long said. "Within the year, we expect to have, or be near, parity with Linux."
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RE[3]: Not gonna happen
by antonis00 on Sat 13th May 2006 08:55 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Not gonna happen"
antonis00
Member since:
2006-03-26

"... but BSD licensing does have some plus points"

Indeed it does... if you call a plus taking advantage of someones hard work to make money and not giving anything back.

Edited 2006-05-13 08:57

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Not gonna happen
by Manik on Sat 13th May 2006 13:15 in reply to "RE[3]: Not gonna happen"
Manik Member since:
2005-07-06

OMG ! That tired argument again ! Dammit, BSDL developpers are GIVING, repeat GIVING their hard work voluntarily and DON'T CARE, repeat DON'T CARE if people take advantage. In fact, they HOPE, repeat HOPE, somebody will take advantage of their code. They hope also that people taking their code will give back, but they let people FREE to CHOSE. ABSOLUTELY FREE.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Not gonna happen
by Cloudy on Sat 13th May 2006 17:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Not gonna happen"
Cloudy Member since:
2006-02-15

"... but BSD licensing does have some plus points"

Indeed it does... if you call a plus taking advantage of someones hard work to make money and not giving anything back.


As someone who has done corporate development under both the BSD and GNU licenses, and has given back equally (and held back equally) in both environments, I can say that in the real world this argument is a non-starter.

It's easy enough to get around the GPL and LGPL and not 'give back'.

Meanwhile, the BSD license makes it possible for me to use BSD in environments where GPL is unacceptable to management -- and I still get to 'give back' any changes made to BSD.

Companies protect what they believe to be their IP when they use the GPL just as readily as when they use the BSD license.

You don't think so? Ask google about their distributed Linux system some time.

Reply Parent Score: 3