Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 24th May 2006 18:57 UTC
SuSE, openSUSE Linux.com reviews SUSE 10.1, and concludes: "With SUSE 10.1, Novell has embraced and extended its role as the leading desktop distribution. Given the amount of eye-popping eye candy and playtime 3-D effects available on this desktop, it's easy to forget that Novell is all about bringing Linux to the corporate - not the home - desktops. Yes, the money is all in the server market these days, but after the revolution Linux will inherit its rightful share of desktops, too."
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RE[2]: New perspective
by grat on Thu 25th May 2006 13:07 UTC in reply to "RE: New perspective"
grat
Member since:
2006-02-02

Well, even though Red Hat is a Gnome based company, they said JBoss - and you'd have to say they were right. Making 3D desktop cubes, as nice an additional activity as it is, isn't going to bring the money in.

Err... Mono is being used in package management, Banshee, and iFolder (which is a nice little application). Red Carpet, and Mono were the main reasons Novell bought Ximian. By the time they're done, they'll have a unified package management system at the level of their Zenworks for windows, and that will be very attractive at the corporate level. It *is* a bit unstable at the moment, though.

It has approximately zero in common with XGL-- which, by the way, isn't actually configured by default, because Novell knows it's a bit buggy still too. ;)

Personally, after hammering on 10.1 for awhile, I came to the conclusion that it's not a bad release, although the package management led to some serious hair pulling on an amd64 system. Some of that was because I was *too* knowledgable, and tried to clean up the mess rug/yast made.

As soon as some updates come out for rug/yast/libzypp (next week, supposedly), I'll probably start using it on my production desktops, but I doubt I'll have XGL enabled.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: New perspective
by segedunum on Thu 25th May 2006 14:36 in reply to "RE[2]: New perspective"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Err... Mono is being used in package management, Banshee, and iFolder (which is a nice little application).

Err. It still isn't making any money directly for them, they had a first rate, *working* package management system before which they've now turfed out for something that isn't working, iFolder was originally written in Java and then ported to Mono for no apparent reason and there are other music apps like amaroK which Novell hasn't had to reinvent.

The original poster was right. There just seems little point.

By the time they're done, they'll have a unified package management system at the level of their Zenworks for windows

Integrate YaST. It works, has worked for years and isn't more complex than it needs to be. The general consensus is that you take something that has proved to be solid, and has worked for years, and then add to it rather than turf out and rewrite.

and that will be very attractive at the corporate level.

Other distributions have done distributed package management for years. Are they attractive at the corporate level? (Whatever that tends to mean these days)

It has approximately zero in common with XGL

I mentioned XGL with reference to the article. Besides, it doesn't really alter the fact that you're going to need a decent hardware accelerated driver to be able to use it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: New perspective
by elsewhere on Thu 25th May 2006 15:15 in reply to "RE[3]: New perspective"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Err. It still isn't making any money directly for them, they had a first rate, *working* package management system before which they've now turfed out for something that isn't working, iFolder was originally written in Java and then ported to Mono for no apparent reason and there are other music apps like amaroK which Novell hasn't had to reinvent.

The original poster was right. There just seems little point.


That's the biggest gripe I have with Novell.

They are gambling that mono will lead to widespread corporate adoption. So be it. But this drive to monofy everything for the sake of it is a risky game.

They can point to apps like Banshee, fine. Mono can be an effective application framework for linux, which isn't really lacking in options there anyways.

But the issues they've had with beagle, zen and ifolder in the past raise questions. Many people still have problems with beagle (though I'll admit it works surprisingly well for me in Suse 10.1), zen is clearly a mistake and mono required some serious restructuring to meet Novell's requirements for iFolder and scaleability. Are they using the right tool for the right job, or is it mono for the sake of mono?

I'm not a dev so I can't chime in on the technical merits of mono versus other frameworks.

But as a user, my experience with mono-based apps has been lacklustre at best and the zmd thing that was foisted on Suse 10.1 at the last minute for no legitimate reason leaves a bad taste in my mouth. At least in previous versions or in other distros, users generally have the option to select mono-based apps or not. Novell is removing that choice.

If mono is an effective framework, it should find it's own audience. If it needs to rammed down people's throats to "prove" acceptance, then that smacks of Redmond-style thinking and could backfire on Novell.

I think they need to start treading carefully.

Reply Parent Score: 1