Linked by Adam S on Fri 26th May 2006 11:13 UTC, submitted by mike_m
Google Google Labs has released Picasa for Linux, ported using Wine by CodeWeavers. The free Picasa download is available now. My Take: The software requirements are fairly hefty in that some features require cutting edge programs like HAL and a 2.6+ kernel, but this is fantastic news for Linux users. Picasa is an excellent program that rivals iPhoto. Update by AS : Google ported Picasa using Wine, but it was still a LOT of work and the result was completely effective. Please read more on the WineHQ mailing list. Update 2: You do not need Wine installed to run this - it's a self-contained Wine lib. Also, the Picasa download apparently doesn't work from all countries. Update by TH: Here's a review.
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libwine != wine
by Marciano on Fri 26th May 2006 15:14 UTC
Marciano
Member since:
2005-07-08

As a previous poster has already pointed out, what they did was *port* Picasa to Linux using the libwine compatibility library. This means that you *don't* have to have Wine installed to run Picasa---as far as the user is concerned, it runs just like any Linux app.

In fact, one can think of libwine as somewhat like Qt. It provides a GUI toolkit, plus APIs to access other OS services.

M

Reply Score: 5

RE: libwine != wine
by butters on Fri 26th May 2006 15:35 in reply to "libwine != wine"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

Yes, this is the key point to understand. Google/Codeweavers has actually set a fine example for windows ISVs everywhere on how to quickly and easily support their win32 applications on Linux. I hate running Lotus Notes on Wine (I have to if I want to simultaneously keep my job and run Linux), and I wish it were ported in this manner.

The Wine layer is essentially a stopgap solution. However, building windows applications for Linux using libwine is a sustainable development practice, offering good performance and usability for both the vendor and end user. I join the posters thanking Google for continuing to contribute positively to free software, albeit at their own pace.

Reply Parent Score: 5