Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 2nd Jun 2006 19:51 UTC, submitted by Tyr.
Windows Computerworld's Scot Finnie details 20 things you won't like in Windows Vista, with a visual tour to prove it. He says that MS has favored security over end-user productivity, making the user feel like a rat caught in a maze with all the protect-you-from-yourself password-entry and 'Continue' boxes required by the User Account Controls feature. "Business and home users will be nonplussed by the blizzard of protect-you-from-yourself password-entry and 'Continue' boxes required by the User Account Controls feature, for example." Update: Apparantly, Vista Beta 2 sucks up battery juice much faster than XP does.
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MS Vista
by poohgee on Sat 3rd Jun 2006 02:18 UTC
poohgee
Member since:
2005-08-13

Looong Windows review seems to result in a pro Windows user base on here - only the hardcore reads all 18 pages ;)

To me - good review .

It didn't seem whiney at all - he actually praised Vista for running nicely with 64MB of graphics memory AFAIK.

Most of the points mentioned seem to be things that one can just easily adapt to - some seemed more difficult to get used to.

There was no mention of DRM technology which IMO would be interesting.

The greatness of OSes chart at the start IMO was rubbish - it reads like a chart of "How much eye candy is included in the default" - not - "usability & quality" .

GNOME Linux is IMO as usable as OSX & better than Windows XP usability.
It makes no sense for Windows 98 to me so much below Win-Vista or especially XP.
Win98's interface is not very different from XP.
For him to throw in a chart covering many different OSes Id expect him to explain & justify it instead of thrusting in onto the reader as a fact of some kind .

The second interesting point to me was that of the different capabilities of the different versions which seemed a bit strange to me :

1.Businesses are not supposed to have Media Center access - makes no sense to me - are they supposed to buy a dedicated system ?
2.Businesses wont be able to make DVD's - Why ?
3.Home users do not have build in fax (hasnt that died out ?) & scan ability .
4.Network access protection not for home users ? Firewall or what ?
5. Smart cards not for home users ?
6. No domain join for Win Server - what does this mean for home networking ?
7. No dual-CPU systems for home users - push to Ultimate ;) for gamers & high end users



Okay there is a 3rd thing : The moaning about making the "real" access to the shutdown menu difficult - great decision IMO - I dont see the problem at all.

Reply Score: 1

RE: MS Vista
by n4cer on Sat 3rd Jun 2006 05:22 in reply to "MS Vista"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

1.Businesses are not supposed to have Media Center access - makes no sense to me - are they supposed to buy a dedicated system ?

Businesses wanting MCE would choose Ultimate. The average business desktop user has no need for MCE.

2.Businesses wont be able to make DVD's - Why ?

This refers to Windows DVD Maker, an application which is targeted at home users. Businesses still get integrated data DVD burning.


3.Home users do not have build in fax (hasnt that died out ?) & scan ability .

This refers to Windows Fax & Scan (an application). Users can still fax via the included fax driver and scan using OEM software.

4.Network access protection not for home users ? Firewall or what ?

IIRC, NAP is only useful if you're on a domain (e.g., for quarentining systems from the larger network based on enterprise policy). Since the Home SKUs can't join a domain, they don't need NAP. Firewalls are included in the Home SKUs.

5. Smart cards not for home users ?
It doesn't say smart card support. It says integrated management. Vista SKUs capable of joining a domain have built-in management tools for smartcards such as password reset and reissue features.

6. No domain join for Win Server - what does this mean for home networking ?

Home networks don't use domains. They use workgroups. Home users in need of a domain are a special case and should use a non-Home SKU.

7. No dual-CPU systems for home users - push to Ultimate ;) for gamers & high end users

Most home computers don't have multiple CPUs. Though there is a limit of one physical CPU in Home SKUs (not new), they can use as many real cores and/or virtual (e.g., hyperthreading) cores as you can fit on the CPU.

Reply Parent Score: 1