Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 13th Jun 2006 12:11 UTC, submitted by John McWell
Windows More than 60 percent of compromised Windows PCs scanned by Microsoft's Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool between January 2005 and March 2006 were found to be running malicious bot software, the company said. The tool removed at least one version of the remote-control software from about 3.5 million PCs, it added. That's compared with an overall 5.7 million machines with infections overall. "Backdoor Trojans [...] are a significant and tangible threat to Windows users," Microsoft said in the report.
Thread beginning with comment 132941
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Computer license
by patrix on Tue 13th Jun 2006 13:33 UTC in reply to "RE: Computer license"
patrix
Member since:
2006-05-21

Remember the blackout of 2003? Well the same company had a nuclear plant (thankfully offline) that got infected by one of those famous early 2000s windows viruses - because there was a link between the monitoring computers and the office computers, that bypassed the secure closed network the monitoring computers were supposed to be on.

End result was that monitoring was off, and was only discovered when some old non-computer monitoring equipment was checked. Imagine if the plant had been operational...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Computer license
by silicon on Tue 13th Jun 2006 14:02 in reply to "RE[2]: Computer license"
silicon Member since:
2005-07-30

They run Windows on their damn nuclear reactor monitoring
computers?

Screw them..... Fire the authority who took such a decision. I think the license of the power company should be revoked.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Computer license
by raver31 on Tue 13th Jun 2006 14:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Computer license"
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

Fire the authority who took such a decision. I think the license of the power company should be revoked.

why ?

Microsoft marketing deptartment makes all decision makers believe that Windows is the most secure system,
and that it is the best system for all uses. They also point out that Windows is more secure with every release/update.

The sad part is that they believe them.


My washing powder washes whiter than before.... where my clothes always dirty before ?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Computer license
by emokid156 on Tue 13th Jun 2006 17:21 in reply to "RE[3]: Computer license"
emokid156 Member since:
2006-04-19

They run Windows on their damn nuclear reactor monitoring
computers?

Screw them..... Fire the authority who took such a decision. I think the license of the power company should be revoked.


Does the Windows AUP not explicitly state that Microsoft products should not be used in mission critical systems?

Edit: I can't find a quote to verify this. All I can find in Microsoft Eulas is about Java not being suitable for use inthese environments.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Computer license
by TaterSalad on Tue 13th Jun 2006 14:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Computer license"
TaterSalad Member since:
2005-07-06

Bullcrap! The report from the blackout specifically stated it was not a virus.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Computer license
by patrix on Tue 13th Jun 2006 19:38 in reply to "RE[3]: Computer license"
patrix Member since:
2006-05-21

Bullcrap! The report from the blackout specifically stated it was not a virus.


^^^^^^^^^^^

I never said the blackout was caused by a virus. I said the same company suffered from a Windows virus infection in an offline nuclear plant.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Computer license
by dylansmrjones on Tue 13th Jun 2006 14:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Computer license"
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Using Windows 2000 in such an environment is suicide. Try OpenBSD instead.

Imagine a space craft running Windows. It would probably be a very interesting experience when entering the atmosphere of Earth during a BSOD.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Computer license
by DrillSgt on Tue 13th Jun 2006 18:09 in reply to "RE[3]: Computer license"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"Imagine a space craft running Windows. It would probably be a very interesting experience when entering the atmosphere of Earth during a BSOD."

If you still actually GET a BSOD, then you need to take a basic computing course, as you definitely do NOT know how to use windows.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Computer license
by tertiary_adjunct on Tue 13th Jun 2006 15:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Computer license"
tertiary_adjunct Member since:
2006-01-15

Was this a US plant or somewhere else?

If it was a US plant, I wonder why the NRC approved the use of Windows? My brother is a lead developer operating systems for nuclear power plants (no Windows for them). He had to go through hell just to get approved to use an LCD display and color in the interface he was developing. It had not been approved before to do so, so the NRC was very reluctant to allow it.

The most commercial software I've heard of running in the nuclear power plant industry is the use of Visual Studio, because there are certain libraries that have been approved and standardized by the NRC (all ANSI stuff - nothing special like .Net) and the compiler itself. There are others, but that is the most well known.

Generally nuclear plants also run on embedded systems, not somthing you load up from an HD and install through CDs.

I would be surprised to hear that this is a plant in the US, of course there was that plant in Ohio (Davis Betsy) that havd a huge hole in the top of the reactor and they were running the damn thing so anything is possibile I guess.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Computer license
by elsewhere on Tue 13th Jun 2006 16:02 in reply to "RE[3]: Computer license"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

I would be surprised to hear that this is a plant in the US, of course there was that plant in Ohio (Davis Betsy) that havd a huge hole in the top of the reactor and they were running the damn thing so anything is possibile I guess.

Ironically that is the plant the OP is referring to.

The core systems don't run on Windows, but Slammer snuck into the network via an "unmonitored" T1, found an unpatched server and created network havoc and congestion that caused indirect failure of the monitoring gear on the same network. This happened prior to the big blackout.

http://www.securityfocus.com/news/6767

As for the blackout itself, nobody with any credibility or legitimacy believes it was a Microsoft virus that caused it. There were some working theories that Blaster may have been a contributing factor (one of many in a perfect storm of bad circumstances) only in that it may have prevented PC's used for communications at one of the plants from operating properly, but in no way was Windows running mission critical gear.

Still, it's interesting food for thought on the indirect impact that unsecured systems/networks can have even on isolated secured ones.

Just my 2c...

Reply Parent Score: 3