Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 15th Jun 2006 02:20 UTC
SuSE, openSUSE Microsoft's delay with the release of Windows Vista has left enough wiggle room for other players to pursue the desktop operating system market. An old Microsoft rival, Novell, is angling to seize the day with the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, a desktop OS geared to beat Vista in cost, manageability and features.
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To paraphrase...
by sean batten on Thu 15th Jun 2006 07:08 UTC
sean batten
Member since:
2005-07-06

..."It's the applications, stupid!"

Linux is a great server OS, but when it comes to the desktop it's in a distance third place to Windows and OSX. Sure there are some good applications and suites like OpenOffice and and Gimp, but they're not in the same league as MS Offics and Photoshop (for example). The only desktop app I can think of that beats its MS counterpart is Firefox, but since it runs on Windows as well it's not really an issue :-)

The big problem for desktop Linux is that a lot of the applications are written by people who think it's acceptable to have to edit configuration files in vi in order to get something to work. This hacker mentality if fine in the server world because the server end user is more technically advanced then the desktop end user. I've seen posts where Linux advocates mock non-technical desktop users. This just closes the loop and brings everything back to square one!

Reply Score: 2

RE: To paraphrase...
by Finalzone on Thu 15th Jun 2006 07:38 in reply to "To paraphrase..."
Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

Linux is a great server OS, but when it comes to the desktop it's in a distance third place to Windows and OSX. Sure there are some good applications and suites like OpenOffice and and Gimp, but they're not in the same league as MS Offics and Photoshop (for example).

Problem is both applications like MS Office and Adobe Photoshop are not included with Windows and are too expensive for the normal user. They don't come bundled with Windows Vista let alone XP while OpenOffice ang Gimp are included on most larger distros and free to download. I found mainstream distros to be more desktop friendly than Windows given the fact they include applications ready for use. For Windows, users will have pay extra fees to make the OS more functionnal via vendors.

The big problem for desktop Linux is that a lot of the applications are written by people who think it's acceptable to have to edit configuration files in vi in order to get something to work.
Fast foward. You will find out that you can edit files with any graphical text editor included in modern distros.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: To paraphrase...
by aanund on Thu 15th Jun 2006 08:54 in reply to "RE: To paraphrase..."
aanund Member since:
2005-09-30

Dont know if you are trying to be ironic with the fast forward bit, but I am pretty sure that having to edit files in _any_ text editor was the issue. Configuration utilities are the way to go ;) (with the _option_ of editing config files in a text editor, offcourse;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: To paraphrase...
by unoengborg on Thu 15th Jun 2006 10:37 in reply to "To paraphrase..."
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

The big problem for desktop Linux is that a lot of the applications are written by people who think it's acceptable to have to edit configuration files in vi in order to get something to work.

You should not forget that plain text configuration files have one advantage that GUI style configuration lacks. You can make comments in your config files. That way its much easier to rember why a particular change was made, who did it and when. Or you can just comment out some setting, to do some tests, and then be fairly sure that you can get back to the old settings when the test is done. Features like this are very valuable in server environments with more than one administrator.

In the Desktop area, Linux is rapidly moving away from the old school file editing practices. Most apps have config dialogs nowdays even though the config information still use human readable text files for configuration information. Often the GUI tools even tries to leave things like comments and old vi edits untouched, at least it is much better than MacOS-X in that respect where this is a constant problem.

Even on the server side, there are configuration tools to use if you prefer a GUI approach. I'm primarily thinking of web based tools as webmin that will be able to configure almost every aspect of your computer, from your file server to your databases.

I would say that the problem for Linux that so many people think they need to learn vi to configure, when it in reality only is one of many options.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: To paraphrase...
by snowbender on Thu 15th Jun 2006 13:09 in reply to "To paraphrase..."
snowbender Member since:
2006-05-04

The big problem for desktop Linux is that a lot of the applications are written by people who think it's acceptable to have to edit configuration files in vi in order to get something to work....
hey hey.. let's not exaggerate here, alright. We are reasonable people and so I'd like to mention that Vim and Emacs is definitely tolerable.

=:P

Reply Parent Score: 2