Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Jun 2006 17:19 UTC, submitted by Max
AMD The world's first commercial one-petaflops supercomputer has been commissioned, Codenamed 'Baker', the 24000-socket, Opteron-based Linux system is due to be installed at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2008.
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Dont thrust the government....
by werfu on Tue 20th Jun 2006 18:58 UTC
werfu
Member since:
2005-09-15

What can do a energy agency with 1 petaflop of processing power? Sure, calculate the hole US energy need... I guest this comp won't be used by the NSA to analyse our phone calls, isn't it?

Reply Score: 1

yanik Member since:
2005-07-13

Yeah, why would the US Department of Energy need the World's Fastest Computer?

I just love those american conspiracy theories. Anyone saw Loose Change?

As for 'Baker', why didn't they wait for conroe? Doesn't conroe beat the sh*t out of any AMD cpu?

Reply Parent Score: 0

suryad Member since:
2005-07-09

Only in single threaded performance yes it does. But then again with all those sockets I dont think Conroe has the badnwidth capabilities needed to scale as well as AMD processors do.

Reply Parent Score: 5

butters Member since:
2005-07-08

"As for 'Baker', why didn't they wait for conroe? Doesn't conroe beat the sh*t out of any AMD cpu?"

Maybe for UP and small MP systems, but for Cray, AMD's Hypertransport is the killer app. They've got their SeaStar high-speed interconnect working well with 4-way Opteron nodes already, so this is a no-brainer.

Intel's got the better roadmap in embedded and mobile processors, but AMD's got the better roadmap for servers and HPC, particularly in high-density and cluster-MP scenarios (where IBM's System P is a hard sell, even on the very high-end).

I'm still mad at free-market economics for killing the development of high-end vector processors. Only because of the PS3 is there an outside chance of another vector powerhouse within the next 10 years. It doesn't make sense to pump all of those power-sapping clock edges through thousands of CPUs unless the code is very branch-heavy, and HPC is not. Cray got it right the first time, and the investors have themselves to blame for being too bullish on the inherently low-volume HPC market.

Reply Parent Score: 3

cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

"Yeah, why would the US Department of Energy need the World's Fastest Computer?"

See your skies and gas prices lately? Why wouldn't that agency want one? We need solutions, and people aren't about to stop buying SUVs (you know, conserve, so deman isn't skrocketting).

"As for 'Baker', why didn't they wait for conroe? Doesn't conroe beat the sh*t out of any AMD cpu?"

Does Conroe beat the K8? Yes.
Will it beat the K8L and friends? We'llhave to see.
Did Intel give Cray any goodies? Did maybe they treat them poorly? Did AMD and Cray get in some kind of contract, maybe? Or, was Cray just impressed enough the last time around to not want to switch? Maybe it as to do with the upgrades to other systems.

Reply Parent Score: 2

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

Yeah, why would the US Department of Energy need the World's Fastest Computer?

2 words: physics simulations

Or more specifically, they simulate nuclear explosions ever since test detonating nuclear weapons was banned in the US.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Sphinx Member since:
2005-07-09

Yeah, why would the US Department of Energy need the World's Fastest Computer?

predicting the spreading hole in the ozone and how long this planet has to live at our current consumption rate.

Reply Parent Score: 1