Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Jun 2006 14:09 UTC, submitted by Flatline
Novell and Ximian Novell's board of directors on Thursday named Ron Hovsepian CEO and president to replace Jack Messman, and ousted the company's chief financial officer. In a conference call on Thursday, company executives said the changes were made to accelerate the growth at Novell, which has had disappointing financial results, particularly in its Linux business.
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No surprise
by cendrizzi on Thu 22nd Jun 2006 19:26 UTC
cendrizzi
Member since:
2005-07-08

Many people were assuming these same changes. Hovsepian seemed to always be a stronger candidate than Messman.

As for Novell not being able to compete with Redhat, I have to disagree. Novell *could* destroy Redhat if they would get their strategy together. They have more money, more programmers, and a much stronger technology set. The problem is they aren't put together in any kind of cohesive manner. Why do I have to install eDirectory as a seperate product (etc, etc)? MS wins big in this categary. Install Win2k3 and you're presetned with a simply dialogue asking you what roles you want to add. It's easy, very easy! And when you're an overworked IT worker it can really help out.

Novell's problem is they are divided between legacy and future (in more ways than Novell and Linux, just look at ConsoleOne and iManager). Linux is the clear future but they have yet to execute their Linux strategy in a meaningful way.

Their next set of enterprise products look to be a step in the right direction but I doubt they're far enough.

Reply Score: 3

RE: No surprise
by Googlesaurus on Fri 23rd Jun 2006 06:29 in reply to "No surprise"
Googlesaurus Member since:
2005-10-19

"As for Novell not being able to compete with Redhat, I have to disagree. Novell *could* destroy Redhat if they would get their strategy together."

Novell "could" have destroyed Microsoft on the server front too. "IF", they would have had their strategy together. Nearly a decade later, they still have no strategy or clear pathway back to the market.

I don't believe anyone here is questioning the programming and software capabilities of Novell. What most seem to be saying is their marketing department is lost in the distant past.

Reply Parent Score: 1