Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Jun 2006 14:09 UTC, submitted by Flatline
Novell and Ximian Novell's board of directors on Thursday named Ron Hovsepian CEO and president to replace Jack Messman, and ousted the company's chief financial officer. In a conference call on Thursday, company executives said the changes were made to accelerate the growth at Novell, which has had disappointing financial results, particularly in its Linux business.
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kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

Their desktop does have potential, but if there aren't the ISV's there to provide the very software which companies rely to run their business on, then the whole exercise is a waste of time.

In a nutshell, their marketing is crap, their products are unfocused, their direction is questionable - putting all the eggs into one basket in regards to mono, and worse still, they've done little to actually integrate the SuSE product line up into a single, coherient Linux straterg that convinces customers that there is some longevity in their roadmap, rather than it being a half-hearted attempt to stay alive.

Reply Parent Score: 1

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Their desktop does have potential, but if there aren't the ISV's there to provide the very software which companies rely to run their business on, then the whole exercise is a waste of time....putting all the eggs into one basket in regards to mono

Quite right too. I can't fathom why Novell hasn't got this. OK, maybe I can. But the only way to attract ISVs is to build up a large enough userbase, and there's no way a large userbase will be built up with Novell hoping that OEMs like HP and Dell will simply wake up one morning and decide to ship their OS.

To build up the userbase Novell need a desktop distribution to give away for free over the internet, and also the ISV programming infrastructure needs to be there. It doesn't take a genius to work out that you need the right technology to do that, and if you have a whole division devoted to Mono, a division of people devoted to the underlying desktop components and a division of people devoted to producing meaningful applications out of that technology then you're not exactly going to get far.

Edited 2006-06-23 15:39

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Quite right too. I can't fathom why Novell hasn't got this. OK, maybe I can. But the only way to attract ISVs is to build up a large enough userbase, and there's no way a large userbase will be built up with Novell hoping that OEMs like HP and Dell will simply wake up one morning and decide to ship their OS.

But the user base won't come unless there is the software there for them to use, thus you're stuck in a chicken before the egg scenario.

The only way to break this, is for Novell to talk to some key customers, find a common list of applications that they all need, approach the said vendors and work out a way to get the applications to the Novell platform, be it licencing the source code and Novell porting it, or Novell simply writing a cheque for the company which will pay for the porting costs.

For example, in Australia and New Zealand, MYOB has a 88% strangle hold on the market; the average small business vendor relies on three key applications, MYOB, Office and Publisher.

If Novell can get MYOB ported and bought exclusively to their platform, fix OpenOffice.org up with a decent array of ready to use templates and macro's, along with a decent selection of clipart, and a desktop publisher with lots of templates etc. you would be able to grab the small business market over night, and given that they make up more of the economy, in terms of employment, in most countries, it would be an easy gold mine to pull teasure out of.

Reply Parent Score: 1