Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 26th Jun 2006 18:48 UTC, submitted by dbprice
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris Sun today released Solaris 10 6/06, which provides a host of improvements; most notably, this is the first release to support ZFS. Download it from Sun's Solaris website. A short summary of the new features is also available. Other new features besides ZFS: UDP and TCP/IP improvements, PCI Express support on x86 (including hotplugging), predictive self healing for x64 systems, and much more.
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sorry but Sun can do what it likes
by project_2501 on Mon 26th Jun 2006 22:58 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

sun put in the research, development and testing for the SFS. It paid people and it put in resources. In my view Sun is under no obligation to relicense ZFS to GPL or anything else. I think Sun has been incredibly generous to allow free downloads and even free unsupported commercial use for solaris and excellent tools such as dtrace and zfs.

If the linux community don't like it - why don't they make their own ZFS?

Reply Score: 5

Shaman Member since:
2005-11-15

>In my view Sun is under no obligation to relicense ZFS
>to GPL or anything else.

Perhaps you can point out where someone suggested otherwise? Or are you just "typing out loud?"

> If the linux community don't like it - why don't they
> make their own ZFS?

Probably because it's not the ultimate answer to computing as we know it. It's just a very classy file system with some good tools to manage it. Some great ideas in it, no question, but it will only strongly appeal to a select group of business cases.

On the other hand, I would hope that most of Sun's customers would give it a fair shake and use it for new installs of large-scale storage, since it is there for the taking. Really, they'd be silly not to if the real-world reliability and performance are up to par with the feature set (and I suspect that they are).

Reply Parent Score: 1

whartung Member since:
2005-07-06


Probably because it's not the ultimate answer to computing as we know it. It's just a very classy file system with some good tools to manage it. Some great ideas in it, no question, but it will only strongly appeal to a select group of business cases.


There's a lot of truth in that. Specifically, especially today, while ZFS has many very nice features, it will only migrate up to the users via some gaudy flashing icons on the desktop and some kind of user education campaign.

To me the big value of ZFS for end users is simply storage management. As their disks get bigger and bigger, they can easily add more storage to the pool and just grow it endlessly and "never" run out of disk space, never have to move a file again, never have to copy partitions. Just keep slapping drives willy nilly onto the system, and it gets bigger -- just like RAM.

The fact that on top of that you get all of the other wonderful services of ZFS is just gravy.

No one is going to swap OS's solely for a file system.

But it sure makes anyone who happens to be running Sol 10 already a good reason to upgrade, even without ZFS root.

Reply Parent Score: 3