Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 29th Jun 2006 01:33 UTC
Linux Linux has one, last, chance to become the No1 OS in a particular consumer-oriented market (not counting servers): the mobile phone market. The open nature and yes, the hype around Linux has made lots of mobile-oriented companies to consider using Linux for their next-generation cellphones. But there is a major problem on the way to success, a problem which is created not by Linux itself, but by the greed and close-mindness of these same companies that endorse Linux.
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Cellphones aren't compatible, deal with it
by rhavyn on Thu 29th Jun 2006 02:28 UTC
rhavyn
Member since:
2005-07-06

This isn't a Linux issue, this is the way the cellphone industry works. JavaME isn't compatible across phones. Symbian isn't compatible across profiles and most vendors use a different profile (UIQ versus Series 60 versus Series 30). Heck, unless you're on GSM you don't even get much choice regarding what phones are available. Who cares about compatibility of apps across phones? I'm happy when I have enough of a signal to make a successful call.

And what is the crap with the "one, last, chance" comment? If Linux doesn't take over the cell phone market then suddenly it won't ever take over any market?

What a lame article.

Edited 2006-06-29 02:35

Reply Score: 5

Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

CELLphones are not compatible, SMARTphones are. Do you think that Nokia, Palm and MS are stupid for striving to offer their own platform with binary compatibility? For example, Panasonic and Samsung had offered S60 phones in the past too, and they were compatible with Nokia's S60 phones.

This is what people want more and more.

Regarding S60 2nd and 3rd Edition incompatibility this was a consious decision to break compatibility, just in order to fix the broken security model of Symbian 7.1. If Nokia could, they wouldn't break it.

Edited 2006-06-29 02:44

Reply Parent Score: 1

rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

CELLphones are not compatible, SMARTphones are.

No they aren't and you even give examples of how they aren't in your own comment.

Do you think that Nokia, Palm and MS are stupid for striving to offer their own platform with binary compatibility?

Which is three different incompatible platforms right there. Lotta good that does you. And Nokia isn't compatible across all their smartphones, Series 30 and Series 60 are not compatible, nor are their Linux devices.

For example, Panasonic and Samsung had offered S60 phones in the past too, and they were compatible with Nokia's S60 phones.

Which aren't compatible with UIQ from Ericsson (also Symbian) or anyone else.

This is what people want more and more.

Right, and that's why Palm is now using WinMob on the Treo, because of good compatibility with PalmOS, right? That's why Nokia uses three different smart platforms, Linux, and 2 Symbian. That's why Ericsson Symbian isn't compatible with anyone else (not to mention Ericsson's other, failed, smart platforms). WinMob isn't compatible with anyone else. Motorola isn't compatible across their phone lines. Heck, JavaME isn't compatible and its Java.

Who are you kidding, this isn't a Linux thing, this is a cell phone industry thing. And seriously, get a grip, no one but you really cares. Most of us are happy to manage to receive phone calls reliably, forget about "smart" features.

Reply Parent Score: 5

dimitris Member since:
2006-06-30

Regarding S60 2nd and 3rd Edition incompatibility this was a consious decision to break compatibility, just in order to fix the broken security model of Symbian 7.1. If Nokia could, they wouldn't break it.

The only thing "broken" with Symbian 7 security that Symbian 9 "fixes" is the ability of operators to lock down whose native applications get access to what OS capabilities/APIs.

Based on the track record of telcos in innovative software provision, I'm willing to bet real money that this is the beginning of Symbian's end.

Some parallels with Unix vendors' antics in the late 80s/early 90s, while Microsoft was working on/pushing/debugging Windows on the desktop, cannot be escaped.

BTW for real open Linux phones, look for something like this:

http://telefono.revejo.org/

delivered on a cheap Chinese-built hardware platform.

Reply Parent Score: 1