Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 7th Jul 2006 13:28 UTC
Microsoft Microsoft plans to issue patches for 'critical' Windows and Office security problems as part of a regular update scheduled for Tuesday. The software company said in an advisory Thursday that it will issue four bulletins for Windows flaws and three for Office. At least one Windows and one Office problem are deemed 'critical', Microsoft's highest-risk category for security vulnerabilities, according to the advisory.
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Just so I'm clear on this ...
by tomcat on Sat 8th Jul 2006 00:30 UTC
tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

... so when MS releases a patch, it's bad ... and when others do it ... it's good? Uhhhhhhhhhhh....

Reply Score: 1

garymax Member since:
2006-01-23

Any OS is going to need critical bug fixes and updates. But with Microsoft, you get more updates and security fixes than other OS's, and then there's the need to reboot between patches, making it a longer process, etc.

But the real rub with Microsoft is the fact that you are paying for their software. And if you part with your hard-earned money to get something, that "something" should at least be as good as a free counterpart--if not better.

Week after week Linux shows its stability and its security by out-performing Microsoft with a cost of *free*.

It wouldn't be so bad if Microsoft didn't charge so much for their software. But with Microsoft, you not only get to pay outrageous sums for mediocre software, you spend a good deal of your time messing with malware, spyware, security updates and bug fixes.

Good thing they don't charge you for that too...

Reply Parent Score: 5

suryad Member since:
2005-07-09

Despite being an XP user I totally agree.

Reply Parent Score: 1

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Any OS is going to need critical bug fixes and updates. But with Microsoft, you get more updates and security fixes than other OS's...

I disagree -- because it depends on how you define "OS updates". Windows comprises not only a kernel but also all of the drivers and applications that ship with the product. Linux devotees tend to draw a distinction between these components -- but the fact of the matter is that, if you ship them on a CD with a distro and the packages are installable, users tend to think of them as one and the same, regardless of the technical distinctions. And, if you consider apps and drivers as part of a particular distro, then Linux has just as many (if not more) updates.

Granted, you get many of those updates faster than you would with Microsoft. But it's questionable whether businesses can consume patches with that kind of regularity. Usually, they have to stage the patched production system somewhere, test it, and then deploy after it passes some level of testing. That takes time; in fact, if I recall correctly, many of Microsoft's corporate customers told the company that they want monthly updates in order to help with their planning.

and then there's the need to reboot between patches, making it a longer process, etc.

Depends on the patch. Not all patches require a reboot.

But the real rub with Microsoft is the fact that you are paying for their software. And if you part with your hard-earned money to get something, that "something" should at least be as good as a free counterpart--if not better.

Linux isn't free -- unless your time is free. Mine isn't. There's always a cost associated with my time.

Week after week Linux shows its stability and its security by out-performing Microsoft with a cost of *free*.

See previous comment.

It wouldn't be so bad if Microsoft didn't charge so much for their software. But with Microsoft, you not only get to pay outrageous sums for mediocre software, you spend a good deal of your time messing with malware, spyware, security updates and bug fixes.

I don't spend any time messing around with malware. I don't run software contained in email attachments or unknown software from the Web. I don't mess around with updates because my machine automatically downloads and installs updates in the middle of the night. So, honestly, I fail to see why the TCO with Linux would be much better than that.

Don't get me wrong. I use Linux all the time on some of my boxes. It's a useful OS. I just don't think that its use and maintenance are free; if anything, I spend a lot of time hunting for information on problems that are readily taken care of by Windows, itself. But at least there are solutions, either way.

Reply Parent Score: 1