Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 15th Jul 2006 22:45 UTC
.NET (dotGNU too) Jeff Cogswell writes: "I'm about to make a confession. Even though I've written several books and articles about C++, I have a secret: C++ isn't my favorite language. I have lots of languages that I use, each one for different purposes. But the language I consider my all-time favorite is Python."
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RE: Python is . . .
by Tuishimi on Sun 16th Jul 2006 18:00 UTC in reply to "Python is . . ."
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

?! Pure personal opinion. I "personally" loved FORTRAN and it was one of my favorite languages to implement IS applications in the late 80's and early 90's. It was fast, had a clean layout, simple syntax and on a VAX running VMS could link into and use any graphical library you wanted. You could also implement modern data structures yourself if you needed them.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Python is . . .
by rayiner on Sun 16th Jul 2006 18:26 in reply to "RE: Python is . . ."
rayiner Member since:
2005-07-06

The biggest problem with FORTRAN is that it creates this single-threaded array-centric mindset in the people who use it. It recently fell on me to maintain some data collection software which was obviously written by a FORTRAN programmer outside our company. It's so bad. Dynamic memory allocation? Pshaw. Locking? Never heard of it. Win32 message loop? What's that?

In my (admittedly limited) experience, Java tends to corrupt the mind less than does FORTRAN or C. At least a Java guy will err on the side of too much abstraction, or too much dynamicism, or too much locking or thread-safety, because Java kind of programs you to do that. When it comes time to extend the software later, that's less of a pain to deal with than not enough of these things.

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RE[3]: Python is . . .
by Tuishimi on Sun 16th Jul 2006 18:45 in reply to "RE[2]: Python is . . ."
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Two things, not that I mentioned WHEN I used FORTRAN, better tools have since arrived on scene, and note that you do not NEED dynamic memory and multi-threading for MOST APPLICATIONS. If you need any kind of data locking you could either rely on a database or file system, or even use shared, public pages to manage locking.

Please never say that a programming language "creates this" or "creates that". The people who use it are the ones responsible for HOW it is used. Programming languages do not write programs, people write programs.

Reply Parent Score: 1