Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 16th Jul 2006 20:16 UTC, submitted by jake tate
Linspire Kevin Carmony of Linspire/Freespire has announced that the first beta of Freespire has been released earlier than anticipated. Get it from the download page. According to Carmony, this release includes out-of-the-box support for proprietary formats such as .mp3 and WMV, plug-and-play support for Ati and nVIDIA cards without user intervention, Click-N-Run, and much more.
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Isn't it violation of GPL?
by jbalmer on Mon 17th Jul 2006 01:03 UTC
jbalmer
Member since:
2005-12-18

According to Carmony, this release includes out-of-the-box support for proprietary formats such as .mp3 and WMV, plug-and-play support for Ati and nVIDIA cards...

I am not a legal expert but didn't the act of bundling propritery nvidia card drivers land another distribution into trouble some time back?

On a different note, I think this is the step in the right direction for a Linux distribution and kudos to Carmony for taking this step of releasing Freespire.

Edited 2006-07-17 01:05

Reply Score: 1

RE: Isn't it violation of GPL?
by butters on Mon 17th Jul 2006 04:04 in reply to "Isn't it violation of GPL?"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

It depends on how they do it. If they put the proprietary code on the install CD image, or if the installer pulls it from the net by default, then it is a violation. If the code is not distributed on the CD and the installer (upon detecting the appropriate hardware) prompts the user to accept the license and download the proprietary driver, then it is perfectly legit.

The other distribution you are referring to (I can't remember which one) was a LiveCD that contained the proprietary drivers on the disk and loaded them without asking the user's permission. That got them in trouble.

It's all a load of crap IMHO. So many products and services operate with terms like: "by using this product or service, you agree to abide by our license or terms of service." If these proprietary software vendors would agree to similar terms, then everyone's life would be much easier.

Reply Parent Score: 1

CaptainTux Member since:
2006-07-17

"If these proprietary software vendors would agree to similar terms, then everyone's life would be much easier."

Between the FSF and the OSI, we have our share of licenses and conflicts. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

"It depends on how they do it."

Yes.

"If they put the proprietary code on the install CD image"

No , not at all , you can mix proprietary and GPL software on the same CD image.

"or if the installer pulls it from the net by default,"

No , thats not a/the problem either.

You cant link GPL software to proprietary software directly , You cant integrate GPL code in your software/driver if the end result is not GPL.

Kororaa did put ATI and Nvidia propritary module in the Linux kernel on there Live CD and linked them with GPL code directly.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Isn't it violation of GPL?
by butters on Mon 17th Jul 2006 04:11 in reply to "Isn't it violation of GPL?"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

Oh, and I should clarify that it wouldn't be a violation of the GPL governing the distribution of the distro (finally a good reason to use that abbreviation), it would be a violation of general copyright law with respect to the proprietary vendor's code.

Reply Parent Score: 1