Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 30th Jul 2006 15:42 UTC
Internet & Networking This week, The Register ran a story on how the US supposedly had given up its 'control' over ICANN. ICANN, the body which assigns IP addresses and domain names worldwide, currently falls under the US Commerce Department via a contractual agreement; this means the US government can control ICANN. El Reg claimed the US had given up this control; Ars was quick to respond, stating that "the existing arrangement was likely to continue, at least for another year." Since the US had stated that it wanted to fully privatise ICANN by 2000, we'll have to wait and see what ICANN looks like in a year. In the meantime, do we really want the US to open up ICANN?
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compatibility
by arpan on Sun 30th Jul 2006 17:00 UTC
arpan
Member since:
2006-07-30

Railways across the world are not compatible. You can't just take a train from one country and run it in another country with modifications.

The best thing about having a single authority deciding things, is that everything remains compatible, ie, I, from India, can access OSNEWS a US site, without any problem.

If each country built their own networks with their own standards, this would be very difficult to maintian, having to build seperate compatibility gateways between the different internets.

I don't have much respect for the UN, since all they do is quarrel, and don't really do anything about the people that are suffering (example: in Africa), and I don't see a single example of what they could do better than ICANN.

As far as I'm concerned, if it isn't broke, don't fix it unless you have a really really good reason.

Reply Score: 5

RE: compatibility
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 30th Jul 2006 17:02 in reply to "compatibility"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Railways across the world are not compatible. You can't just take a train from one country and run it in another country with modifications.

Yet, I can take the train from London, and go all the way to Beijing if I want to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: compatibility
by Wondercool on Sun 30th Jul 2006 18:03 in reply to "RE: compatibility"
Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

Sorry Thom, but I think Arpan has a point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_gauge

In fact railways a vastly different between countries.
It's highly unlikely that you can take the same train to different countries. It's like power plugs in this respect. Your electrical equipment will work, but only after conversion, adding to ineffeciency and cost.

Just imagine that the internet works the same. It would mean you need to have conversion to get your packet to another country.

It's more likely we have so many railroad standards because England did NOT control the railroads.

Maybe the internet standards are already so strong that it doesn't matter anymore who controls them as they won't change anymore (no I am not talking about HTML standards but about lower level protocols like TCP/IP)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: compatibility
by MikeGA on Sun 30th Jul 2006 17:05 in reply to "compatibility"
MikeGA Member since:
2005-07-22

Please tell me that awful pun wasn't intended!

Oh, and I believe that OSNews is a Dutch site in fact, not that it really matters.

I don't think the suggestion is to give control of each country''s internet to a body within the country itself (which like you say could lead to incompatibility issues).

Instead, the idea is simply to remove any link from the US government itself. So, I don't think you have to worry about too much squabbling (hopefully!).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: compatibility
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 30th Jul 2006 17:32 in reply to "RE: compatibility"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Oh, and I believe that OSNews is a Dutch site in fact, not that it really matters.

I'm Dutch. OSNews, and all people working on OSN besides me, are American.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: compatibility
by Cloudy on Sun 30th Jul 2006 20:54 in reply to "compatibility"
Cloudy Member since:
2006-02-15

If each country built their own networks with their own standards, this would be very difficult to maintian, having to build seperate compatibility gateways between the different internets.

This is true. It also has nothing to do with ICANN. ICANN doesn't set any internet standards. It merely applies the subset of standards that relate to DNS. from their web site:

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is responsible for managing and coordinating the Domain Name System (DNS) to ensure that every address is unique and that all users of the Internet can find all valid addresses. It does this by overseeing the distribution of unique IP addresses and domain names. It also ensures that each domain name maps to the correct IP address.

The only thing that would change with a change of control of ICANN is who gets to decide how IP addresses and domain names are handed out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: compatibility
by OMRebel on Mon 31st Jul 2006 14:24 in reply to "compatibility"
OMRebel Member since:
2005-11-14

Arpan,

Even though you've made an excellent point, the problem is that so many people here are anti-US that they do not care. They view anything associated with the US as evil. Nevermind this whole uproar that started this entire debate is about some EU countries wanting more money. We can bring up the facts about the French wanting to levy taxes on emails. That'll get ignored. We can discuss your point on compatibility, and how you're right about it. That'll get ignored. The only thing so many on here are concerned about is continuing to lash out at the US over any issue.

Take Thom's article for example. I get sick and tired of hearing the anti-US crowd try to trumpet up Tim Berners-Lee as the most important figure head of the Internet. That is an extremely flawed statement. Berners-Lee has this direct quote, "If you are looking for fathers of the Internet, try Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn..." Lets see here. Bob Kahn - American. Vint Cert - American. And what about David Clark? - American. DARPA - American. Berners-Lee did make a contribution (HTTP), but IP and email weren't his doings. They were American inventions.

Look, I'm not posting this to get into a US vs the world type of debate. I'm just setting the record straight, as every single time this discussion comes up, the anti-US crowd jumps in with their slams and bashes, and try to spread their misinformation on the subject. I'm just setting the record straight. America did invent the Internet, and others made big contributions to new technologies. However, no need in spreading lies and refusing to give credit where credit is due when it comes to which country really invented it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: compatibility
by Michael on Mon 31st Jul 2006 14:44 in reply to "RE: compatibility"
Michael Member since:
2005-07-01

We can bring up the facts about the French wanting to levy taxes on emails.

Yes, let's do that. According to a quick google search on the subject, "the French" is actually a single French MEP who has backed off from the ludicrous suggestion. As the EU has no tax raising powers, there was never any danger of this becoming law. Furthermore, this has sod all to do with ICANN.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: compatibility
by arpan on Mon 31st Jul 2006 16:48 in reply to "RE: compatibility"
arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

I am an Indian, and I know that it is unlikely that India is going to be having much of a say so in the running on the internet either way, so whether it is the US or the UN makes no difference to me. What I would not like is having compatibility problems, since most websites I access related to design, computers, web programming etc., are located outside India.

And a point related to different languages. I don't know how it is in other countries, but in India, we have over 20 major languages, each languages having a number of different font implementations, meaning that if I were to type some text in Telugu in one font from one company, and then wanted to use a font from another country, suddenly all the characters have changed. Basically, because there is no default standard, we have to deal with different font implementations. So which one will be considered correct in this case? And who decides what is correct?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: compatibility
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 31st Jul 2006 17:38 in reply to "RE: compatibility"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

America did invent the Internet, and others made big contributions to new technologies. However, no need in spreading lies and refusing to give credit where credit is due when it comes to which country really invented it.

Like I said, the US had a major stake in the 'invention' of the internet (it is more of an 'evolution' than an invention, by the way, as it is not as if someone woke up one day and said "Hey, I'll build the internet"), but what I am disagreeing with is that that automatically should mean that the US should control the ENTIRE internet, even though 98% of the internet is built and runs OUTSIDE of the United States.

If you think it does, than I figure you also have no problems with giving up the control over US railroads to the British Crown, I guess?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: compatibility
by MysterMask on Mon 31st Jul 2006 18:07 in reply to "RE: compatibility"
MysterMask Member since:
2005-07-12

Look, I'm not posting this to get into a US vs the world type of debate.

Funny - because that's exactely what you do.

America did invent the Internet

Did they? Well, wich part of America was it? Some people from Peru? Or Canada? Native americans? Some immigrants from Europe? Or China?

Your post is a good example why people hate the US. It's the selfishness, arrogance and the bigotry.


Back on topic: I guess it doesn't matter if ICANN is run as a private company or not because as soon as some part of the US govt think they are 'in danger' of loosing control, some form of US market protection will kick in (of course all under the term of 'freedom').

Reply Parent Score: 1